Exciting lesson ideas, classroom strategies, book lists, videos, and reproducibles in a daily blog by teachers

Alycia

I live in New York

I teach third grade

I am an almost-digital-native and Ms. Frizzle wannabe

Rhonda

I live in New Jersey

I teach sixth grade literacy

I am passionate about my students becoming lifelong readers and writers

Christy

I live in New York

I teach K-5

I am a proud supporter of American public education and a tech integrationist

Erin

I live in Michigan

I teach second grade

I am a Tweet loving, technology integrating, mom of two with a passion for classroom design!

Allie

I live in Nevada

I teach PreK-K

I am a loving, enthusiastic teacher whose goal is to make learning exciting for every child

Genia

I live in Michigan

I teach third grade

I am seriously addicted to all things technology in my teaching

Kriscia

I live in California

I teach fourth and fifth grades

I am an eager educator, on the hunt to find the brilliance in all

Brian

I live in North Carolina

I teach kindergarten

I am a kindergarten teacher who takes creating a fun, engaging classroom seriously

Lindsey

I live in Illinois

I teach fourth grade

I am a theme-weaving, bargain-hunting, creative public educator

Use Parents as Math Helpers!

By Beth Newingham on May 8, 2013
  • Grades: 3–5

Many teachers ask how I manage all three math groups when I am only teaching one group. It does take a few weeks at the beginning of the school year for students to learn to work independently at the Independent Practice Station and work cooperatively and quietly at the Games Station

One helpful solution is to ask parents to volunteer to be your math helper during math time each day. The math helper in our classroom works at the Games Station. He or she can help students understand the directions, manage the groups as they play the game, and hold students accountable for their learning.

There are times when students will not put forth as much effort as they should when the teacher is not looking over their shoulder. Having a parent watching them as they play the math game helps ensure that students are getting the most out of the activity. Also, if students have questions about the game they are playing, they do not need to interrupt my teaching. These parents also help out with projects at this station when students are doing collaborative projects as opposed to math games.

To round up parent volunteers for math helpers, we send home a sign-up calendar each month. We almost always have a parent helper at the Games Station to make sure students are getting the most out of the games they play or the projects they are doing.

Comments (2)

I really like how you incorporate some of Epstein's 6 types of parent involvement. It's apparent that you use effective communication from school-to-home and from home-to-school about school programs and student progress. You seem to really involve the parents by allowing them to volunteer to come in and help with math time. It's also neat how you send home a sign-up calendar each month for the parents. This works as a form of communication as well as future volunteer opportunities.

I really like how you incorporate some of Epstein's 6 types of parent involvement. It's apparent that you use effective communication from school-to-home and from home-to-school about school programs and student progress. You seem to really involve the parents by allowing them to volunteer to come in and help with math time. It's also neat how you send home a sign-up calendar each month for the parents. This works as a form of communication as well as future volunteer opportunities.

Post a Comment
(Please sign in to leave a comment. Privacy Policy)
Back to Top