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Assessment in Math Workshop

By Beth Newingham on May 9, 2013
  • Grades: 3–5

In Math Workshop, we give unit tests at the end of each unit to check the students' understanding of the concepts we taught in the unit. But our overall assessment is ongoing (just as it is in Reading and Writing Workshops).

As my teaching partner and I meet daily with each group at the Work With Teacher Station, we keep a clipboard that has a checklist of skills for the unit. We have each child's name listed on the checklist so that we can keep track of students who are struggling with any of the concepts we are teaching.

We try to find time to meet individually with struggling students to reteach the difficult concepts or at least check in on their progress. If an entire group is struggling with a concept in a particular lesson, we will reteach the skill to all students in the group during Math Workshop on another day.

On the sample checklist in the photo, you can see that we use "S," "P," and "N." "S" indicates that a child is "secure" with the concept, "P" means the child is "progressing," and "N" means the child "needs additional support." (The sample checklist does not feature real students.)

Comments (2)

This a really a great idea for developing math among students.This not oly helps them to develop & get strong in basics but also helps to know the tricks & tips in it.

Please send me Social Studies, science Life, Reading about Bill of Rights.

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