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Assessment During Individualized Daily Reading (IDR): Read-Aloud Notebooks

By Beth Newingham on May 31, 2013
  • Grades: 3–5

This is a fabulous idea I read about in Franki Sibberson and Karen Szymusiak's book, Day-to-Day Assessment in the Reading Workshop: Making Informed Instructional Decisions in Grades 3–6.

During read-aloud time, students stop at key points in the story to jot down their thinking in their read-aloud notebooks. They have found that the notebooks are "a safe place for students to use writing as a means to think more deeply about the text."

They do not give much direction in terms of what the students are supposed to write because they want their students to naturally respond to the text in their own ways. They then use the notebooks as yet another way to learn more about their readers. They look for variety in responses, abstract thinking, application of skills taught in previous mini-lessons, etc.

Their book also provides great book lists for read-alouds including favorite read-aloud books for the beginning of the year and many other read-aloud book lists for specific teaching points and concepts.

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