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Word Study Program: Creating a Yearlong Plan

By Beth Newingham on February 20, 2013
  • Grades: 3–5

When creating our word study program [link to 98: Word Study Program: An Overview], we used a variety of resources to determine the spelling patterns that a typical student should master in 3rd grade. Fountas and Pinnell provide a plan in their book Word Study Lessons: Grade 3 that contains a word study continuum with a suggested order for teaching common spelling patterns. My teaching partner and I looked at this and then determined a specific plan for our 3rd grade class.

After a few weeks of administering inventories and learning about your students’ spelling stages, you may find that your students still need more practice with spelling patterns. Typically, some of our students are still in the late letter-name alphabetic stage, and others are already in the syllables and affixes stage. The majority, however, seem to start the year somewhere in the within word pattern stage. (Read more about the stages of spelling development.)

Since it seemed overwhelming to start students at different units within our yearlong plan, we chose to differentiate our program by having a regular list and a challenge list for each unit. That way we can challenge the students who need more difficult words, but still focus on a common spelling pattern for our whole-class instruction.

Comments (1)

Appreciate you sharing, great blog post. Really Great.
bash

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