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Reader's Notebook: The Reading Log Section

By Beth Newingham on November 15, 2012
  • Grades: 3–5

In my students' Reader's Notebooks the Reading Log is the first section because it's something they need to access easily and often. Every time my students complete a book, they record the book's title and author, and the date they complete the book. After learning about the different genres in our library, students also record the book's genre using a genre code. I find it necessary for my students to also include the book's color coded level and then determine if the book was E (easy), JR (just right), or C (challenging) after they have finished reading it.

Recording the actual level with their corresponding level of comfort with the book is an important component of my reading log because my students are constantly encouraged to reflect on their personal reading growth. It's through the regular recording of their books that students realize when a color code is becoming easier for them as the year progresses. It's at this point that they may decide to try out a book at a higher level.

Students revisit their reading log often when making connections between books they are currently reading and books they have read previously. They also use their reading log to create genre graphs at the end of each unit of study.

I choose to print multiple copies of the reading log on card stock instead of regular paper so the reading log pages do not rip out of the students' binders. This record of reading is such an important reflection of each student's reading growth over the school year, so spending a little extra money on card stock to make sure the log stays in the binder is worth it to me!

Download the Reading Log.

Comments (1)

How long to you recommend introducing each of the genres?

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