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Alycia

I live in New York

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Rhonda

I live in New Jersey

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I am passionate about my students becoming lifelong readers and writers

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Erin

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John

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Genia

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I am a teacher who loves sparking the curiosity that ignites a child's learning

Kriscia

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I am an eager educator, on the hunt to find the brilliance in all

Brian

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I am a kindergarten teacher who takes creating a fun, engaging classroom seriously

Lindsey

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Shari

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Christy

I live in New York

I teach K-5 technology

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Amanda

I live in Illinois

I teach 1st and 2nd grades

I am a jewelry-making, pet-loving, runner, crafter, and bilingual teacher

Allie

I live in Nevada

I teach kindergarten

I am a loving, enthusiastic teacher whose goal is to make learning exciting for every child

Alycia

I live in New York

I teach 3rd grade

I am an almost-digital-native and Ms. Frizzle wannabe

Rhonda

I live in New Jersey

I teach 6th grade literacy

I am passionate about my students becoming lifelong readers and writers

Beth

I live in Michigan

I teach 3rd grade

I am an enthusiastic teacher and techie, and a mom of three boys

Erin

I live in Michigan

I teach 2nd grade

I am a Tweet loving, technology integrating, mom of two with a passion for classroom design!

John

I live in New York

I teach writing for grades 5-8

I am a sharpener of minds who keeps students' thinking on point

Genia

I live in Michigan

I teach third grade

I am a teacher who loves sparking the curiosity that ignites a child's learning

Kriscia

I live in California

I teach 2nd and 3rd grades

I am an eager educator, on the hunt to find the brilliance in all

Brian

I live in North Carolina

I teach kindergarten

I am a kindergarten teacher who takes creating a fun, engaging classroom seriously

Lindsey

I live in Illinois

I teach 4th grade

I am a theme-weaving, bargain-hunting, creative public educator

Shari

I live in Idaho

I teach kindergarten

I am a wife, mom, and home chef who loves cooking up ways to make learning fun in school

Christy

I live in New York

I teach K-5 technology

I am a proud supporter of American public education and a tech integrationist

Amanda

I live in Illinois

I teach 1st and 2nd grades

I am a jewelry-making, pet-loving, runner, crafter, and bilingual teacher

Allie

I live in Nevada

I teach kindergarten

I am a loving, enthusiastic teacher whose goal is to make learning exciting for every child

The Big Send-Off — Lessons Beyond the Classroom

By Stacey Burt on May 18, 2012
  • Grades: 3–5, 6–8

As the year draws to a close (four and a half days for me), I often find myself reflecting back on it. I consider instructional methods, pacing of material, whether I met the needs of all students, and ways I can improve with the next group of students that enter my classroom. Fairly standard thoughts for most educators, I imagine.

For many of you, what your students do outside of your classroom may also cross your mind. You follow their successes and sometimes their disasters. You celebrate and mourn with them over decisions they make that mold the young adults they will become. This year, however, I was deeply impacted by what one of my students taught me.

 

Student G

In the classroom, the courage and determination of my students is tangible. I see it, experience it, and embrace it throughout the year. This year I had a student, Student G, we will call her, who taught me a lesson that I would never have expected. In January she caught me before class one day and told me that she had an idea to help the homeless in our area of middle Tennessee. In a hurry to start class, I told her that I wanted to hear all about it, but after class.

Student G remained behind at the conclusion of the lesson and informed me that she was taking all of her birthday money to start creating “homeless bags” for homeless individuals she encountered with her parents as they traversed our small city. In great detail she described what she had purchased to place in these bags. I was dumbfounded. Here before me was an 11-year-old child telling me that she was making a difference for people she did not even know. In great amazement I listened to her for months about updates on the homeless she was assisting in our area. She had photographs of the individuals and even knew their names and the names of their pets. Most recently she has even branched out to create “family bags” with enough items to help two or more people.

As I write this I am reflecting on the teachers that had the greatest impact on my life. I can think of two distinct educators that molded the person I became in very subtle, but real ways. For the life of me I cannot remember the grades I earned or specific lessons they taught me. Instead I remember their character and dignity. I remember the example they set for our class, school, and community. Those were the lessons that proved to be the most valuable to me. As far as Student G is concerned, I will forever remember her character and dignity and the humility she shows complete strangers. The example she sets for others is greater than any lesson I could ever teach in the classroom.

So as you close out this year and say goodbye to your students for summer, I hope you know that in subtle and profound ways all year you have impacted souls that will leave with knowledge you have taught them — probably a lot that was never intended to be part of the lesson plan. I want to remind you that you have done good work and that your students will pay it forward in some small, or perhaps big way, in the future. Have a great summer and here’s to a job well done in 2012!

Best—
Stacey

Comments (3)

It is a great thing for any child to do and I am very proud of her.

What an inspiring student!

Wow.

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