Kid-Recommended Reading Series

By Brent Vasicek on March 2, 2011
  • Grades: 3–5

Spring break will soon be here. If it is anything like the winter break, students are bound to come back a bit rusty. To avoid this, I use the power of positive peer pressure and have the students recommend their favorite series books to each other.

Spring break will soon be here. If it is anything like the winter break, students are bound to come back a bit rusty. To avoid this, I use the power of positive peer pressure and have the students recommend their favorite series books to each other. I find that once a student connects with a series, they tend to go to the school library each week with a positive attitude, knowing exactly which book they want to borrow next. Below is a list of book series recommended by 4th and 5th graders for some spring break reading enjoyment.   

 

 

 

 

RamonaThe Ramona Books by Beverly Cleary (3rd grade)

Ramona is always getting into some sort of trouble. She is a fun character that girls tend to fall in love with. Beverly Cleary does a great job of making all of her characters quirky and fun. There are eight books in this series.

The Henry Books by Beverly Cleary (4th grade)

Henry is a friend of Ramona's. Same fun writing by Beverly Cleary, but this time the boys tend to identify with main character a bit better.

 

Diary of a Wimpy Kid Diary of a Wimpy Kid Series by Jeff Kinney (5th grade)

Greg Heffley is a funny and awkward child with many observations about the world. This book is written in a cartoon format, which appeals to many young readers.

 

 

 

HatchetThe Hatchet Series by Gary Paulsen (5th grade) 

Also known as the Brian Series, this is a favorite among the nature lovers and the boys in the classroom. One cool thing to know about these books is that Paulsen wrote Brian's Winter as an alternative ending to Hatchet.

 

 

Among the Hidden The Shadow Children Series by Margaret Peterson Haddix (5th grade)

This series, which begins with Among the Hidden, is set in a future when each family is only allowed to have two children. What do the families with three children do? The series gives an interesting perspective of the daily life of a child in hiding.

 

 

 

American Chillers American Chillers and Michigan Chillers by Jonathan Rand (4th grade)

The short cliff-hanger chapters are what many students like about these books. From the teacher's perspective, students get some mini-geography lessons as they read. The short chapters make these great read-alouds at the end of the day.

 

 

 

FudgeThe Fudge Books by Judy Blume (4th grade)

This series, which begins with Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, includes five classic books. My students love reading about Peter's pesky younger brother Fudge. He is always getting into some sort of fun and embarrassing trouble.

 

  

 

Narnia

The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis (4th grade)

This is imagination and fantasy at its finest. Students love to delve into this make-believe world, especially after being inspired by the movie.

 

 

 

Unfortunate Events SeriesA Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket (5th grade)

This rather depressing series is a favorite among many. It tells the tale of orphans who are paired with one quirky, distant relative after another. As with many of the series on this list, there are movies based on the books. Encourage parents to rent the movies for their child to stimulate some excitement for reading.

 

 

Little HouseLittle House Books by Laura Wilder (4th grade)

Remember the television show Little House on the Prairie? It described what life was like in a world without advanced technology. These books are set in the past and help students gain appreciation for all they have today. 

 

 

 

 

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What series of books would your students add to the list?

2I2 Trademark 2010 Vasicek Read every day,

Brent

www.mrvasicek.com

2i2 is a trademark of Mr. Vasicek's class. It means doing your best every day and doing it with Integrity.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

MY son enjoys Rick Riordan books The Percy Jackson seris and the continuation of the kids at Camp Half-blood!

My 5th grade students love The Sisters Grimm series! The books are suspenseful, humorous, and the connections in the book to fairy tales intrigue them.

Sounds like a great addition to the growing list. Brent

My daughter is loving the Ga'Hoole Series. She is in 5th.

Melissa, I will have to check that series out. Thanks. Brent

My students are fighting over the 39 Clues books. The Bones books are great for reluctant readers. The City of Ember series has also been ery hot.

Thanks for adding to the list! Brent

I know they are old, but I read #1 in the Boxcar Children series to the class. Then they all pick another one to read and share with the class. We make lists of all the characters, settings and story happenings. They seem to like the books, easy to read and they keep their interest.

I love the Boxcar Children! They were very popular when I was a kid. I like the idea of having each student read one and share it with the class. Thanks, Suzi! ~Brent

My fifth graders have recently gotten into the new 39 Clues books.

Thank you, Sarah. Brent

I know my students would recommend the Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's series where the boys are against the girls in all sorts of fun situations. There are twelve books in the series, each taking place in a different month of the year. It starts with The Boys Start the War (September) and continues with The Girls Get Even (October) and so on.

My middle school students would add:

- The Princess Diaries series by Meg Cabot - The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collines - The Percy Jackson and the Olympians series by Rick Riordan - The Gallagher Girls series by Ally Carter - The His Dark Materials series by Philip Pullman - The 39 Clues series - The Guardians of Ga'Hoole series by Kathryn Lasky

Allison,

Thanks for expanding the list. You included some great ones! Especially, The Hunger Games.

~Brent

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