Exciting lesson ideas, classroom strategies, book lists, videos, and reproducibles in a daily blog by teachers

Alycia

I live in New York

I teach 3rd grade

I am an almost-digital-native and Ms. Frizzle wannabe

Rhonda

I live in New Jersey

I teach 6th grade literacy

I am passionate about my students becoming lifelong readers and writers

Beth

I live in Michigan

I teach 3rd grade

I am an enthusiastic teacher and techie, and a mom of three boys

Erin

I live in Michigan

I teach 2nd grade

I am a Tweet loving, technology integrating, mom of two with a passion for classroom design!

John

I live in New York

I teach writing for grades 5-8

I am a sharpener of minds who keeps students' thinking on point

Genia

I live in Michigan

I teach third grade

I am a teacher who loves sparking the curiosity that ignites a child's learning

Kriscia

I live in California

I teach 2nd and 3rd grades

I am an eager educator, on the hunt to find the brilliance in all

Brian

I live in North Carolina

I teach kindergarten

I am a kindergarten teacher who takes creating a fun, engaging classroom seriously

Lindsey

I live in Illinois

I teach 4th grade

I am a theme-weaving, bargain-hunting, creative public educator

Shari

I live in Idaho

I teach kindergarten

I am a wife, mom, and home chef who loves cooking up ways to make learning fun in school

Christy

I live in New York

I teach K-5 technology

I am a proud supporter of American public education and a tech integrationist

Amanda

I live in Illinois

I teach 1st and 2nd grades

I am a jewelry-making, pet-loving, runner, crafter, and bilingual teacher

Allie

I live in Nevada

I teach kindergarten

I am a loving, enthusiastic teacher whose goal is to make learning exciting for every child

Alycia

I live in New York

I teach 3rd grade

I am an almost-digital-native and Ms. Frizzle wannabe

Rhonda

I live in New Jersey

I teach 6th grade literacy

I am passionate about my students becoming lifelong readers and writers

Beth

I live in Michigan

I teach 3rd grade

I am an enthusiastic teacher and techie, and a mom of three boys

Erin

I live in Michigan

I teach 2nd grade

I am a Tweet loving, technology integrating, mom of two with a passion for classroom design!

John

I live in New York

I teach writing for grades 5-8

I am a sharpener of minds who keeps students' thinking on point

Genia

I live in Michigan

I teach third grade

I am a teacher who loves sparking the curiosity that ignites a child's learning

Kriscia

I live in California

I teach 2nd and 3rd grades

I am an eager educator, on the hunt to find the brilliance in all

Brian

I live in North Carolina

I teach kindergarten

I am a kindergarten teacher who takes creating a fun, engaging classroom seriously

Lindsey

I live in Illinois

I teach 4th grade

I am a theme-weaving, bargain-hunting, creative public educator

Shari

I live in Idaho

I teach kindergarten

I am a wife, mom, and home chef who loves cooking up ways to make learning fun in school

Christy

I live in New York

I teach K-5 technology

I am a proud supporter of American public education and a tech integrationist

Amanda

I live in Illinois

I teach 1st and 2nd grades

I am a jewelry-making, pet-loving, runner, crafter, and bilingual teacher

Allie

I live in Nevada

I teach kindergarten

I am a loving, enthusiastic teacher whose goal is to make learning exciting for every child

Sharing the Wealth: Presenting at State and National Conferences

By Stacey Burt on September 30, 2009

(presenting information at Space Camp Turkey in Izmir to educators from Israel, Turkey, Canada, and the United States)

As I mentioned in a previous post, all of you have outstanding ideas. My challenge to you all this week is to “share the wealth.” Teachers have a difficult time actually believing that what they are doing in the classroom is innovative, creative, or more effective than what the teacher across the hall is doing; however, I am here to let you know that everyone of you have loads to contribute to the teaching community.

For the first 3 or 4 years of my career I felt like it was my duty to create “original” lessons for my students. In time I realized that it was a perfectly acceptable practice to use others’ ideas and simply tweak them to make them work for my students and classroom teaching style. Over time, and many, many conferences, graduate classes, and professional development sessions later, I understood that taking bits of all different ideas and combining them is how most teachers have taught for generations.


So here is where your challenge begins. I know that you all have outstanding ideas for effectively teaching concepts and skills to your students. With that stated, it is time for you; yes you, to think about presenting your best ideas at professional conferences. Many of you may already be adept at this type of thing; however, I am willing to bet that many of you have thought about it, but have not initiated an attempt at submitting a proposal.

BEST and Cruise 058

There are many state conferences that you could look into first. For example, most states host technology conferences for educators (this was one of my first conferences to present at). You all creatively infuse technology into your lessons on a daily basis. Now think of some of your best lessons, and consider presenting those ideas with your colleagues (no one says you have to do this alone). From the state circuit, I want you to consider national conferences. For instance, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) all have their annual conferences some time in November. I know what you are thinking, “a little too late to make a proposal for this year,” and you’re right. However, the proposal cycle for 2010 will quickly be upon you and you want to have your proposal written out and ready to submit. Some proposals are already being accepted for next October, NSTA for instance.

This year I am presenting at the 56th annual National Association for Gifted Children in St. Louis. It is a conference that I attend every year, and finally, decided that I had a few good ideas that I would propose for presentation. You can so do this! Here are some tips I have for making proposals to present at local, state, or national conventions/conferences:

1. Catchy title- Like grant writing it is your hook, so engage the reader of your proposal.

2. Relevance- Think about trends and issues in education and what you are doing to address those every day in your classroom.

3. Success- Review those lessons that you love to teach. Think about how you enhance or modify them every time you teach them and how your students connect and love the lessons. Those are the ones that are worth sharing.

4. Comments from other teachers- Recall the projects and lessons that you have taught in which your colleagues were very complimentary and impressed.

5. Wide audience- The larger an audience your lessons can reach the better. Think about flexibility and modification for lower and upper grade levels.


I hope that you are willing to share a little of your expertise at the next state or national conference. Sharing our best and most effective ideas is not only exciting, but benefits our students and their learning needs. Good luck and I hope to attend one of your sessions at one of the next national gifted, science or math conferences I attend. You’re all awesome educators!

Warm Regards-

Stacey

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