Writing your Article

Take your research and turn it into a story

  • Grades: 3–5, 6–8

Most newspaper articles break down into two categories:

  • News articles
  • Feature articles

You will also find opinion pieces, like editorials and book and movie reviews, but this lesson deals strictly with news and feature articles.

Here's how you can tell the difference between a news story and a feature story.

  • News articles cover the basics of current events. They answer the questions: who, what, where, how, and when?
  • Feature articles are longer and more in depth than regular news articles. They cover one subject from multiple angles and are written in a more creative, entertaining format. Although a news story can be creative and entertaining, too! Check out the examples below.

It is important to remember that both news and features demand the same level of research and reporting.

Here are some examples of news and feature articles from the Scholastic Kids Press Corps. Read them all. Then write your own articles modeled after them.

News

Pandemic Level Increased
A straightforward news story in a typical news format.

Harry Potter Opens July 15
This is a news article written in an entertaining and creative format.

Out of the Classroom, Into the Garden Straightforward news format.

Features

Green House
Earth Day Special Report feature.

Fireflies Count
A feature story told from the first person point of view.

Astronaut Interview
A feature story done in a Q & A format.

The Basic Story Outline
The best way to structure a newspaper article is to first write an outline.

Review your research and notes. Then jot down ideas for the following six sections. Remember, this is just a foundation upon which to build your story!

I. Lead sentence
Grab and hook your reader right away!

II. Introduction
Which facts and figures will ground your story? You have to tell your readers where and when this story is happening.

III. Opening quotation
What will give the reader a sense of the people involved and what they are thinking?

IV. Main body
What is at the heart of your story?

V. Closing quotation
Find something that sums the article up in a few words.

VI. Conclusion (optional—the closing quote may do the job)
What is a memorable way to end your story? The end quote is a good way to sum things up. That doesn’t always work. If you are quoting more than one person with different points of view in your story, you cannot end with a quote from just one of them. Giving one of your interviewees the last word can tilt the story in their favor.

In this age of the Internet, you can also end your story with a link to more information or even your own behind-the-scenes blog post!

Now It’s Your Turn!

STEP 1: Read an article from the Scholastic Kids Press Corps and fill in the following blanks:
What is the…?
Lead sentence:
Introduction:
Opening quotation:
Main body:
Closing quotation:
Conclusion:
Remember, not ALL of these elements may be represented in the story, or even in one place.

STEP 2: Now, using your research and notes, write an outline for your own article!

Remember, your first version of a story is a first draft, not a finished article. Here a few good tips for turning in a quality story to your editor/teacher.

  • Read the story at least one time for comprehension. You want to make sure your writing tells a story with a beginning, middle, and end. Also, check to make sure you have at least two good quotes in it if at all possible.
  • Go back over your draft to check for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Now, read it out loud! This will help you catch any awkward phrases, or sentences that don’t sound right.
  • Once your piece is polished, turn it in to your editor. Be sure you have a slug or headline (which tells the subject of the story), a date, and your byline!

Back to: Teaching with the Scholastic Kids Press Corps

  • Subjects:
    Reading, Nonfiction Writing, Traits of Writing, Writing Process
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Scholastic Kids Press Corps

The Scholastic Kids Press Corps was a team of about 50 Kid Reporters around the nation that brought news to life with reporting for kids, by kids.