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Flashlight Readers Standards and Lesson Plan Benchmarks

Find out which standards the Flashlight Readers activities meet, as well as the benchmarks met by specific Flashlight Readers lesson plans.

  • Grades: 3–5, 6–8

Standards Met by All Flashlight Readers Activities

The Flashlight Readers activities meet national standards by providing students with opportunities in the following areas:

Reading and Language Arts

International Reading Association (IRA), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.):

  • Collects data, facts, and ideas
  • Selects, organizes, and categorizes information using a wide variety of strategies
  • Analyzes, interprets, and evaluates information, ideas, organization, and language from text
  • Listens attentively to others and builds on others' ideas in discussions
  • Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process
  • Uses the general skills and strategies of the reading process

Technology

Technology Foundation Standards for Students:

  • Uses technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity
  • Uses technology tools to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences
  • Uses a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences
  • Uses technology tools to process data and report results 

 

Benchmarks for Each Lesson


Because of Winn-Dixie

Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)

Lesson 1: Because of Winn-Dixie Scrapbook Lesson Plan

  • Understands elements of character development in literary works (e.g., differences between main and minor characters; stereotypical characters as opposed to fully developed characters; changes that characters undergo; the importance of a character's actions, motives, and appearance to plot and theme)
  • Makes connections between characters or simple events in a literary work and people or events in his or her own life

Lesson 2: Stump the Dump Maze Game Lesson Plan

  • Understands the basic concept of plot (e.g., main problem, conflict, resolution, cause-and-effect)
  • Applies basic trouble shooting and problem-solving techniques

Lesson 3: About the Author: Kate DiCamillo Lesson Plan

  • Drafting and revising: uses strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., elaborates on a central idea; writes with attention to audience, word choice, sentence variation; uses paragraphs to develop separate ideas; produces multiple drafts)
  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)


Holes

Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)

Lesson 1: Holes Match 'Em Up Challenge Lesson Plan

  • Understands the basic concept of plot (e.g., main problem, conflict, resolution, cause-and-effect)
  • Knows themes that recur across literary works
  • Understands complex elements of plot development (e.g., cause-and-effect relationships; use of subplots, parallel episodes, and climax; development of conflict and resolution)

Lesson 2: Cause and Effect with The Treasure of Green Lake Lesson Plan

  • Understands complex elements of plot development (e.g., cause-and-effect relationships; use of subplots, parallel episodes, and climax; development of conflict and resolution)
  • Makes, confirms, and revises simple predictions about what will be found in a text (e.g., uses prior knowledge and ideas presented in text, illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues)

Lesson 3: Explore Writing With Louis Sachar Lesson Plan

  • Reflects on what has been learned after reading and formulates ideas, opinions, and personal responses to texts
  • Makes, confirms, and revises simple predictions about what will be found in a text (e.g., uses prior knowledge and ideas presented in text, illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues)

Lesson 4: Write Your Own Screenplay Lesson Plan

  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)
  • Drafting and revising: uses a variety of strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., analyzes and clarifies meaning, makes structural and syntactical changes, uses an organizational scheme, uses sensory words and figurative language, rethinks and rewrites for different audiences and purposes, checks for a consistent point of view and for transitions between paragraphs, uses direct feedback to revise compositions)
  • Editing and publishing: uses a variety of strategies to edit and publish written work (e.g., eliminates slang; edits for grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling at a developmentally appropriate level; proofreads using reference materials, word processor, and other resources; edits for clarity, word choice, and language usage; uses a word processor or other technology to publish written work)


Esperanza Rising

Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)

Lesson 1: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words Lesson Plan

  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., applies criteria generated by self and others, uses self-assessment to set and achieve goals as a writer, participates in peer response groups)
  • Writes narrative accounts, such as short stories (e.g., establishes a situation, plot, persona, point of view, setting, conflict, and resolution; creates an organizational structure that balances and unifies all narrative aspects of the story; uses a range of strategies and literary devices such as dialogue, tension, suspense, naming, figurative language, and specific narrative action such as movement, gestures, and expressions)
  • Reflects on what has been learned after reading and formulates ideas, opinions, and personal responses to texts

Lesson 2: Journal of Time, a Historical Perspective Lesson Plan

  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., applies criteria generated by self and others, uses self-assessment to set and achieve goals as a writer, participates in peer response groups)
  • Understands reasons for varied interpretations of visual media (e.g., different purposes or circumstances while viewing, influence of personal knowledge and experiences, focusing on different stylistic features)
  • Uses strategies (e.g., adapts focus, organization, point of view; determines knowledge and interests of audience) to write for different audiences (e.g., self, peers, teachers, adults)
  • Writes in response to literature (e.g., responds to significant issues in a log or journal, connects knowledge from a text with personal knowledge, states an interpretive, evaluative, or reflective position; draws inferences about the effects of the work on an audience)

Lesson 3: Pam Muñoz Ryan Shares Writing Secrets Lesson Plan

  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., applies criteria generated by self and others, uses self-assessment to set and achieve goals as a writer, participates in peer response groups)
  • Writes narrative accounts, such as short stories (e.g., establishes a situation, plot, persona, point of view, setting, conflict, and resolution; creates an organizational structure that balances and unifies all narrative aspects of the story; uses a range of strategies and literary devices such as dialogue, tension, suspense, naming, figurative language, and specific narrative action such as movement, gestures, and expressions)


Inkheart

Language Arts (McRel)

Lesson 1: It Is Your Opinion Lesson Plan

  • Prewriting: uses prewriting strategies to plan written work (e.g., uses graphic organizers, story maps, and webs; groups related ideas; takes notes; brainstorms ideas; organizes information according to type and purpose of writing)
  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)
  • Uses strategies (e.g., adapts focus, organization, point of view; determines knowledge and interests of audience) to write for different audiences (e.g., self, peers, teachers, adults)

Lesson 2: Building Believable Characters Lesson Plan

  • Uses descriptive language that clarifies and enhances ideas (e.g., establishes tone and mood, uses figurative language, uses sensory images and comparisons, uses a thesaurus to choose effective wording)
  • Uses appropriate verbal and nonverbal techniques for oral presentations (e.g., inflection/modulation of voice, tempo, word choice, grammar, feeling, expression, tone, volume, enunciation, physical gestures, body movement, eye contact, posture)
  • Understands elements of character development (e.g., character traits and motivations; stereotypes; relationships between character and plot development; development of characters through their words, speech patterns, thoughts, actions, narrator's description, and interaction with other characters; how motivations are revealed)

Lesson 3: Getting Ready to Write Lesson Plan

  • Uses a variety of resource materials to gather information for research topics (e.g., magazines, newspapers, dictionaries, schedules, journals, phone directories, globes, atlases, almanacs, technological sources)
  • Organizes information and ideas from multiple sources in systematic ways (e.g., timelines, outlines, notes, graphic representations)
  • Prewriting: uses a variety of prewriting strategies (e.g., makes outlines, uses published pieces as writing models, constructs critical standards, brainstorms, builds background knowledge)


Hoot

Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)

Lesson 1: Write for Change Lesson Plan

  • Reflects on what has been learned after reading and formulates ideas, opinions, and personal responses to texts
  • Uses a variety of strategies to plan research
  • Writes persuasive compositions
  • Evaluates own and others' writing

Lesson 2: Picturing the Story Lesson Plan

  • Evaluates own and others' writing
  • Drafting and revising: uses a variety of strategies to draft and revise written work
  • Editing and publishing: uses a variety of strategies to edit and publish written work

Lesson 3: Up Close With the Author Lesson Plan

  • Reflects on what has been learned after reading and formulates ideas, opinions, and personal responses to texts
  • Evaluates own and others' writing


Charlotte's Web

Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)

Lesson 1: Comic Strip Creations Lesson Plan

  • Uses prewriting strategies to plan written work (e.g., uses graphic organizers; brainstorms ideas; organizes information according to type and purpose of writing)
  • Uses strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., elaborates on a central idea; writes with attention to audience, word choice, sentence variation)
  • Uses strategies to edit and publish written work (e.g., edits for grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling at a developmentally appropriate level; selects presentation format according to purpose; incorporates photos and illustrations; uses technology to compose and publish work)
  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)
  • Writes in response to literature (e.g., summarizes main ideas and significant details; relates own ideas to supporting details; advances judgments; supports judgments with references to the text, other works, other authors, non-print media, and personal knowledge)

Lesson 2:  What's the Word? Lesson Plan

  • Uses word reference materials (e.g., glossary, dictionary, thesaurus) to determine the meaning, pronunciation, and derivations of unknown words
  • Understands level-appropriate reading vocabulary (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homophones, multi-meaning words)

 Lesson 3: Compose a Collaborative Play Lesson Plan

  • Uses prewriting strategies to plan written work (e.g., uses graphic organizers; brainstorms ideas; organizes information according to type and purpose of writing)
  • Uses strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., elaborates on a central idea; writes with attention to audience, word choice, sentence variation; produces multiple drafts)
  • Uses strategies to edit and publish written work (e.g., edits for grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling at a developmentally appropriate level; uses reference materials; considers page format; selects presentation format according to purpose; uses technology to compose and publish work)
  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)
  • Uses strategies to write for a variety of purposes (e.g., to inform, entertain, explain, describe, record ideas)
  • Works cooperatively within a group to complete tasks, achieve goals, and solve problems
  • Provides feedback in a constructive manner and recognizes the importance of seeking and receiving constructive feedback in a non-defensive manner


A Dog's Life

Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)

Lesson 1: A Tale to Tell! Lesson Plan

  • Uses prewriting strategies to plan written work (e.g., uses graphic organizers; brainstorms ideas; organizes information according to type and purpose of writing)
  • Uses strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., elaborates on a central idea; writes with attention to audience, word choice, sentence variation)
  • Uses strategies to edit and publish written work (e.g., edits for grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling at a developmentally appropriate level; selects presentation format according to purpose; incorporates photos and illustrations; uses technology to compose and publish work)
  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)
  • Writes narrative accounts, such as poems and stories (e.g. establishes a context that enables the reader to imagine the event or experience; develops characters, setting, and plot; creates an organizing structure; sequences events; uses concrete sensory details; uses an identifiable voice)
  • Writes in response to literature (e.g., summarizes main ideas and significant details; relates own ideas to supporting details; advances judgments; supports judgments with references to the text, other works, other authors, non-print media, and personal knowledge)

Lesson 2: Bone's Adventures Lesson Plan

  • Establishes a purpose for reading (e.g., for information, for pleasure, to understand a specific viewpoint)
  • Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of informational texts
  • Understands the basic concept of plot (e.g., main problem, conflict, resolution, cause-and-effect)
  • Uses listening and speaking strategies for different purposes

Lesson 3: Ann M. Martin's Writing Model Lesson Plan

  • Uses prewriting strategies to plan written work (e.g., uses graphic organizers; brainstorms ideas; organizes information according to type and purpose of writing)
  • Uses strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., elaborates on a central idea; writes with attention to audience, word choice, sentence variation)
  • Uses strategies to edit and publish written work (e.g., edits for grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling at a developmentally appropriate level; selects presentation format according to purpose; incorporates photos and illustrations; uses technology to compose and publish work)
  • Evaluates own and others' writing (e.g., determines the best features of a piece of writing, determines how own writing achieves its purposes, asks for feedback, responds to classmates' writing)
  • Writes in response to literature (e.g., summarizes main ideas and significant details; relates own ideas to supporting details; advances judgments; supports judgments with references to the text, other works, other authors, non-print media, and personal knowledge)
  • Provides feedback in a constructive manner and recognizes the importance of seeking and receiving constructive feedback in a non-defensive manner


Blue Balliett

Lesson 1: Picture the Process! Lesson Plan

  • Language Arts Standards (4th Ed.)
    • Develops the topic with simple facts
    • Organizes details chronologically
    • Uses technology to create and publish written work
  • Working With Others
    • Participates in a variety of group and individual activities
    • Provides feedback in a constructive manner and recognizes the importance of seeking and receiving constructive feedback in a non-defensive manner
  • Technology
    • Applies technology to compose and publish written work

Lesson 2: Do You See What I See? Lesson Plan

  • Language Arts
    • Understands reasons for varied interpretations of visual media
    • Uses reading skills and strategies to understand a variety of informational texts
    • Uses new information to adjust and extend personal knowledge base
  • Art Connections
  • Knows the similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various arts (e.g., form, line, contrast)

Lesson 3: Patterns and Pentominoes Lesson Plan

  • Mathematics
    • Uses a variety of strategies to understand problem situations
  • Thinking and Reasoning
    • Tests a hypothesis, throws out an unsuccessful hypothesis, and formulates a new hypothesis
    • Selects criteria or rules for category membership that are relevant and important
  • Working With Others
    • Works cooperatively within a group to complete tasks, achieve goals, and solve problems

 

  • Subjects:
    Literature, Literature Appreciation
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