Booktalks

Booktalk for Bounce

  • Grades: 6–8

When Evyn's dad remarries and morphs into someone else, Evyn's life falls apart.

What do an art history college professor who looks like Betty Boop and a shaggy-bearded carpenter with grungy overalls have in common? Who knows! But the carpenter is my dad Birdie, and he asked Eleni to marry him only two months after they met. He didn't even check with me and my brother Mackey to see what we thought about it! He just announced that he's getting married, and we're moving to Boston to live with this person we hardly know and her six kids! Six kids, from six to nineteen-what's up with that? Didn't they knew about birth control?

And just to make matters worse, I have to share a room with two of them. They're twins so alike I'll never tell them apart, they're 15, two years older than I am, and look like Betty Boop, just like their mother. You never see them apart, but they never quit fighting. I called them the sweater twins because the first time I saw them, they were arguing about whether one had stolen the other one's sweater.

Phoebe's the youngest, and she's okay, but she's only six. Thalia's 18 and in charge when her mom and my dad aren't around, but no one listens to her. The other two sibs are boys. Ajax-who would name their kid after a cleanser?-is in eighth grade like me, and is really into soccer. Linus, the oldest, doesn't really live at home, but in a dorm on campus. It figures that the only one of them I'd really like to be around, would be the one I'd see the least. He's tall, broad shouldered, with curly hair, great eyes, killer smile, and to top it all off, he's nice! Really nice.

But it's more than strange living with all these people, and seeing my father morph into a whole new person. No beard, no glasses, no overalls. He's become a preppie. And my brother, the tall, genius smart geek with a face full of zits, is suddenly playing the lead in the school musical, and everyone's raving about his wonderful tenor voice.

Suddenly, everyone is changing into someone else, and all I want is to go back to the way it used to be. I know I'm supposed to bounce back from all the changes and bounce my way into some changes of my own. But how can I do that when I've got about as much bounce as an empty soccer ball, a broken nose, and two black eyes?

This booktalk was written by university professor, librarian and booktalking expert Joni Richards Bodart.

 

  • Subjects:
    Changes and New Experiences, Remarriage, Friends and Friendship
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