Booktalks

Booktalk for Airhead, by Meg Cabot

A booktalk and video booktalk for Airhead, a novel by bestselling author Meg Cabot

  • Grades: 6–8

Watch this video booktalk.

After a bizarre accident, Em wakes up to find she's no longer herself, and there's no way to fix it.

My name is Emerson Watts. I'm a junior at Tribeca Alternative High School. My best friend is Christopher, who I secretly have had a crush on for four years. I love baggy clothes and video games. I'm kind of a geek, and I'm totally uninterested in makeup, fashion or being a size zero. I love ice cream, and my favorite part of any meal is dessert. I have straight brown hair, brown eyes, I'm a little chunky, and probably not the most feminine girl in the world, which may be the reason Christopher is a best friend, not a boyfriend.

At least, that's who I was before I went to the Stark's Megastore Grand Opening, just a couple of blocks from our house, and one of the huge plasma screen TVs that they had hanging from the ceiling fell on my head. I woke up in the hospital with a massive headache, wires all over my body attached to machines around the bed, and my parents and my little sister freaking out every time they looked at me, or anytime I said anything. My voice didn't sound like me, it sounded all high pitched and girly. No one would tell me what had happened, and if I asked too many questions, the doctors would just put me back to sleep.

Then one day, I woke up because someone was shaking me really, really hard — and calling me Nikki. It took me a minute to figure out who she was-Lulu Collins, the daughter of the famous director Tim Collins, and the best friend of celebrity supermodel, Nikki Howard. And no matter much I denied it, she was positive that I was Nikki. Then I noticed that my hands and arms looked different-thinner, and my nails were long with a perfect French manicure. And when I felt my face, my skin felt smooth, no bumps at all.

And then I realized that no one had ever shown me a mirror. It wasn't until I saw myself in a mirror that I understood how completely and unbelieveably strange it really was.

This booktalk was written by university professor, librarian, and booktalking expert Joni Richards Bodart.

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