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American Indian Heritage Month

Scholastic Kid Reporters share a collection of stories and interviews to highlight American Indian Heritage. 

  • Grades: 3–5, 6–8

At the beginning of the 20th century, Dr. Arthur C. Parker, a Seneca Indian, began an effort to establish an American Indian Day. Parker, who was director of the Museum of Arts and Science in Rochester, New York, first turned to the Boy Scouts of America for help. The organization agreed to set aside a day to honor native heritage.

American Indian Heritage Month began in 1990. That's when President George H.W. Bush approved a resolution designating November as a time to recognize and celebrate the country's native heritage.

Here, Scholastic Kid Reporters share a collection of stories and interviews to highlight American Indian Heritage. 

 

kid reporter talking to a tribal leader

 

Historic Tribal Nations Meeting
by Alexandra Zhang
President Barack Obama hosts leaders from 564 Native American tribal nations in Washington, D.C.
artist Brian Jungen created a native american mask from Nike Air Jordan shoes Artist Brian Jungen
by Nick Berray
Native American Jungen turns common objects into cultural treasures; he’s currently featured in a major new exhibition at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.
 
still from brain jungen video The Art of Brian Jungen
by Nick Berray
Can’t get to Washington, D.C., to see Brian Jungen’s exhibit at the National Museum of the American Indian? Then take this virtual tour of Jungen’s work.
 
cover of George Sullivan's book Pocahontas: In Her Own Words Pocahontas Book Review
by Maya Kandell
How Pocahontas, a young Powhatan girl who happens to be the chief’s daughter, saved the first English colony 400 years ago.
 
chief Steven Atkins, Kid Reporters Trevor Brada, Lisa Saunders Native American Influence
by Lisa Saunders
America celebrated its 400th birthday two years ago, but it didn’t all begin in 1607, says Steven Atkins, Chief of Virginia’s Chickahominy tribe.
 

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Native American Heritage Activity Set
This activity set explores some of the contributions Native Americans have made—and continue to make —to the culture, tradition, and history of our nation.

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Scholastic Kids Press Corps

The Scholastic Kids Press Corps was a team of about 50 Kid Reporters around the nation that brought news to life with reporting for kids, by kids.