Scholastic Scope | Scholastic.com

December 10, 2012

 

SCOPE ONLINE
Skills-based reading and writing activities for each Scope article
Jump directly to an article’s resources:
NARRATIVE NONFICTION: Disaster on the Mountain
READERS THEATER PLAY: A Christmas Carol
PAIRED TEXTS: Is the World Going to End in 2012?
DEBATE/ESSAY KIT: Did You Really Just Post
That Photo?

THE LAZY EDITOR: Is This Weird Doll Worth
a Million Bucks?

FICTION: The Choice
YOU WRITE IT: “I Can Do Anything”
GRAMMAR GANGNAM STYLE: imply vs. infer
WHOLE-ISSUE REVIEW
ANSWER KEY
SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS

Great news! Most of our activity sheets are now writable PDFs. You can print and copy them or have students fill them out on their computers or tablets. Click here to see instructions for using writable PDFs.


Disaster on the Mountain

SUMMARY: In this gripping survival story, two skiers are caught in a terrifying avalanche in Alaska. We’ve included an amazing full-page infographic (another Common Core-friendly text type!) for a great lesson on key ideas and details. Skill focus: key ideas and details

Lexile Level: 960L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

DIGITAL LESSON PLAN: “An Avalanche of Warnings”
Use our step-by-step multimedia teaching package for a lesson that connects the article, the infographic, Scope activity sheets, and more.

KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS GRAPHIC ORGANIZER
Makes excellent preparation for the writing prompt on page 9, especially for students who need extra scaffolding.

THEMED VOCABULARY: Avalanches
Reinforce the content-area vocabulary from the article with this fun activity. Great for whole-class and small-group work. Click here for an interactive Teacher’s Guide for help using this activity. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

ANALYZING AN INFOGRAPHIC
Multiple-choice and short-answer questions about the infographic on page 9. Requires students to read closely, make inferences, and draw conclusions.

READ, THINK, EXPLAIN: IDENTIFYING NONFICTION ELEMENTS
New and improved! Use our teacher-vetted, scaffolded reading activity to develop your students’ nonfiction-reading skills and strategies and prepare them for higher-level-thinking questions. Don’t miss our nifty glossary of nonfiction terms—an excellent resource that students can use all year long.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students write a letter to a friend on avalanche safety using details from the article and the infographic. Read more about our contests here.


A Christmas Carol

SUMMARY: Back by popular demand! We've updated this gem from our archive with a fresh look, a profile of Charles Dickens, activity sheets, and more. Skill focus: text evidence; making connections between fiction and nonfiction

GET A PDF OF THIS PLAY TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

TEXT EVIDENCE: “Lightening Burdens”
Students find details from the play and the author profile to support a quote from Charles Dickens.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
Students explore character, elements of plot, and more in this self-guided activity. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource that your students can use all year!

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the play. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students explain a quote from Charles Dickens using evidence from the play and author profile. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
ORIGINAL TEXT: A Christmas Carol
The full text of Charles Dickens’s classic novel is available for free online. Share it with your above-level students and challenge them to think about how our adaptation is different from the original.


Is the World Going to End in 2012?

SUMMARY: An ancient Maya calendar has led some to say the end of the world is nigh. (We’re not worried.) We’ve paired an article on the facts behind the myth with a New York Times article dated January 1, 2000, the day after Y2K. Skill focus: text evidence

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN..

Lexile Level: 1045L

TEXT EVIDENCE: “The End(s) of the World”
Students analyze the doomsday predictions in the two articles.

ANNOTATED VERSION OF “COMPUTERS PREVAIL”
This interactive guide to the New York Times article on page 19 explains the various elements of a newspaper article. Use it as a model to help students write their own articles. For a black-and-white, printable version, click here.

GUIDED WRITING: “Write About 12/21/12”
Step-by-step support for using newspaper style in response to the writing prompt on page 19.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the articles. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students write a newspaper-style article dated 12/22/12, imagining the dreaded day after the Maya calendar ends. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCES
PHOTO: Y2K Tabloid Cover
This amazing tabloid cover shows how the media contributed to Y2K hysteria. Project this image for your class and use it to launch a discussion about how the sensationalized news accounts can sometimes play into our fears. Credit: Bat Boy LLC/Weekly World News

VIDEO: ABC News After Y2K
This ABC News broadcast from January 3, 2000, provides additional details about the Y2K scare and its aftermath. It’s also an amusing look at relatively recent history (wait until your students see what computers looked like in 2000!). Length: 4:14. Note: An ad appears before the video begins, so we recommend loading the video before your class starts.


Did You Really Just Post That Photo?

SUMMARY: What young people post on social media sites today could harm their reputations years from now. Are kids doing enough to protect themselves? Skill focus: supporting an argument; reflective writing; identifying main ideas and details

Lexile Level: 960L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

GUIDED WRITING: The Reflective Essay
Our self-guided activity sheet makes essay writing a painless process. Great for homework!

GREAT TRANSITIONS HANDOUT
Using transition words is a key writing skill. Our handout gives students ideas on how to choose the perfect transition word or phrase.

REFLECTIVE-ESSAY CHECKLIST
Have students use our nifty list to check their reflective essays before handing them in. Great for peer review too!

DIY VOCABULARY
This activity helps students keep track of unfamiliar words they encounter in any Scope article. They will use context clues, look up definitions, and use each new word in a sentence. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.


Is This Weird Doll Worth a Million Bucks?

SUMMARY: Students correct grammatical errors and revise sloppy writing in a nonfiction article about people who buy, sell, and generally obsess over old toys and other collectibles. Skill focus: conventions of standard English; revision

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

Please note: These activity sheets are print-only.

COMMA USE
Students review the rules, then practice.

USING PARENTHESES
Rules for using parentheses (and a practice activity!).

IT’S VS. ITS
More practice with these commonly confused words.

CONSISTENT VERB TENSE
Sudden verb tense switches are common writing mistakes. Made them a thing of the past!

AVOIDING RAMBLING/RUN-ON SENTENCES
Students identify and revise rambling and run-on sentences.


The Choice

SUMMARY: When Zander makes a surprising discovery in the pocket of the pants he got from a thrift store, he must make a difficult decision. Will he do the right thing? We pair Nan Marino’s charming story with an advice column. Skill focus: central ideas and details

Lexile Level: 860L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN..

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
This self-guided activity helps students explore character, elements of plot, and more. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource your students can use all year!

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

DIY VOCABULARY
This activity is a great way for students to keep track of unfamiliar words they encounter in any Scope article. They will use context clues, look up definitions, and use each new word in a sentence. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students write a short response to the story and advice column, analyzing what the two texts show us about decisions involving right and wrong. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCES
FROM OUR ARCHIVES: The Necklace
“The Choice” connects beautifully with this play from our archives. It’s based on the famous story by Guy de Maupassant. Ask students to compare the morals of these two jewelry-focused tales—what does the protagonist of each story learn? These two pieces work together so well that we’re giving you the play for free. Enjoy!

MEET THE AUTHOR: Nan Marino
Learn more about Nan Marino, the fabulous author of “The Choice.”


“I Can Do Anything”

SUMMARY: Lola Walter, 13, is a hard-working and talented gymnast—despite the fact that she is legally blind. In this activity, students use our interview with Lola to write a short article about her. Skill focus: identifying central idea and details; summarizing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

GUIDE TO “YOU WRITE IT” ACTIVITY
Our self-guided worksheet walks students through the process of crafting an article.

“YOU WRITE IT” MODEL TEXT
Model the activity with an annotated example of a completed “You Write It” article.

PUNCTUATING QUOTATIONS
Use this activity sheet for extra practice with direct quotes.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Use our handy form to enter students’ work in the “You Write It” contest. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
VIDEO: Blind Gymnast’s Leap of Faith
A fascinating and inspiring ABC News profile of Lola from 2010. Length: 4:09. NOTE: An ad appears before the video, so we recommend loading the video before your class begins.


Grammar Gangnam Style

SUMMARY: Students practice the correct usage of imply and infer while reading about three dance crazes. Skill focus: imply and infer

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

IMPLY VS. INFER
More practice with these commonly confused words.


Whole-Issue Review

READING-COMPREHENSION CROSSWORD PUZZLE
This is a fun way to test students’ understanding of the whole issue. Please note: This activity is print-only.

SCOPE’S SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
Visit our library for a list of basic skills activities for just about any Scope article or story, along with a collection of handy handouts.

ANSWER KEY
Looking for answers? Visit our top-secret website for answers to all quizzes and activities. The URL can be found on page T-3 of your printed Teacher’s Edition.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITY SHEETS FROM THIS ISSUE
Get them all with one simple click. Please note: These activity sheets are print-only.

MORE HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS
TEACHER’S EDITION

Misplaced your TE? No worries! Download it here. Note: This online version does NOT include the answer key or the URL for the answer key.

COMMON CORE, NCTE, AND IRA STANDARDS
How this issue of Scope aligns with these standards.

FAQs ABOUT INTERACTIVE PDFs
Having trouble using our interactive PDFs? Get help here.

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We recommend Firefox or Safari. Still having trouble? E-mail us at scopemag@scholastic.com.

 

 

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