November 2013

 

SCOPE ONLINE
Skills-based reading and writing activities for each Scope article
Jump directly to an article’s resources:
NARRATIVE NONFICTION: “I Was Homeless”
DRAMA: The Piece of String
FICTION: Electric Summer
PAIRED TEXTS: Welcome to the Future
DEBATE/ESSAY KIT: Should Everyone Get a Trophy?
THE LAZY EDITOR: Is That Rock Alive?
GRAMMAR HAS A COSTUME PARTY: who vs. whom
WHOLE-ISSUE REVIEW
ANSWER KEY
SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS

Please note: Most of our activity sheets are writable PDFs. You can print and copy them or have students fill them out on their computers or tablets. Click here to see instructions for using writable PDFs.


“I Was Homeless”

SUMMARY: Until fifth grade, Kevin Liu lived a comfortable life with his family in New York City. Then everything changed when Kevin’s family became homeless. Kevin’s story of struggle and resilience sheds light on homelessness in America. Featured Skill: Synthesizing information from multiple texts

For the complexity factors of this article, including Lexile score, see page T-5 of your Teacher’s Guide.

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S GUIDE LESSON PLAN.
Includes step-by-step lesson plan, differentiated performance tasks, complexity factors, essential questions, literature connections, and more.

VIDEO: “I Lived in a Truck”
When her father lost his job, 15-year-old Arielle Metzger and her family were forced to move into a truck. Many thanks to our friends at Action Magazine for letting us use this wonderful video! Use these video-discussion questions to make connections between the video and the article.

AUDIO: Hear the article read aloud.
Perfect for struggling readers or as listening comprehension practice for your entire class. Click here to find more audio articles.

SYNTHESIZING INFORMATION: Homelessness in America
This graphic organizer helps students synthesize information from the article, essay, and infographic. Great preparation for the writing prompt on page 8.

CLOSE-READING AND CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
For print or projection. These questions also appear in the lesson plan.

READ, THINK, EXPLAIN: IDENTIFYING NONFICTION ELEMENTS
Use our teacher-vetted, scaffolded reading activity to develop your students’ nonfiction-reading skills and strategies, and prepare them for higher-level-thinking questions and class discussion. Makes great homework too. Don’t miss our nifty Glossary of Nonfiction Terms—an excellent resource that students can use all year long. Note: This is a challenging activity, so we’ve provided two versions: VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the article. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Click here to learn more about Scope Vocabulary.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these multiple-choice and short-answer questions based on state and PARCC assessments. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

GRAMMAR SPOTLIGHT: Pronouns and Antecedents
After discussing pronouns within the context of the nonfiction article, reinforce students’ understanding with a Lazy Editor activity. Instructions for this month’s Grammar Spotlight are also included on page T-16 of your Teacher’s Guide. Click here to learn more about our approach to grammar.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
What challenges do the homeless face in America? In what ways does society help, and how could we do more? Students answer these questions using evidence from the article, infographic, and essay. Click here to learn more about our contests.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS ARTICLE.
Get them all in one click!

EXTRA RESOURCE
NATIONAL ALLIANCE TO END HOMELESSNESS
Facts, figures, and more. A terrific resource for additional research on homelessness in America.


The Piece of String

SUMMARY: A peasant in 19th-century France is accused of a crime he didn’t commit. The harder he tries to clear his name, the less people believe him. But does he get what he deserves? Our adaptation of Guy de Maupassant’s classic story makes a great characterization activity. Featured Skill: Characterization

For the complexity factors of this play, see page T-8 of your Teacher's Guide.

GET A PDF OF THIS PLAY TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S GUIDE LESSON PLAN.
Includes step-by-step lesson plan, differentiated performance tasks, complexity factors, essential questions, literature connections, and more.

AUDIO: The Piece of String Pronunciation Guide
The French character names in de Maupassant’s story sure are tricky! Never fear—our audio pronunciation guide—along with this handy handout—will help. Click here to find more audio articles.

MAKING INFERENCES: Analyze Hauchecorne
Students explore indirect characterization and make inferences about the play’s protagonist.

CLOSE-READING AND CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
For print or projection. These questions also appear in the lesson plan.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the play. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Click here to learn more about Scope Vocabulary.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these multiple-choice and short-answer questions based on state and PARCC assessments. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
Students explore character, elements of plot, and more in this self-guided activity. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource that your students can use all year!

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Why didn’t the people of Goderville believe Hauchecorne was innocent? Did he get what he deserved? Students answer these questions in two to three paragraphs. Click here to learn more about our contests.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS PLAY.
Get them all in one click!

EXTRA RESOURCE
ORIGINAL TEXT: “The Piece of String”
The full text of Guy de Maupassant’s classic short story is available for free online. Share it with your above-level students and challenge them to think about how our adaptation is different from the original.


Electric Summer

SUMMARY: A young farm girl travels to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, where she sees an amazing vision of America’s future—and her own. We’ve paired this beautiful coming-of-age tale by Richard Peck with an informational text on world’s fairs and a fabulous video about the early 20th century. Featured Skill: Analyzing character/inference

For the complexity factors of these texts, including Lexile scores, see page T-11 of your Teacher's Guide.

GET A PDF OF THIS STORY TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S GUIDE LESSON PLAN.
Includes step-by-step lesson plan, differentiated performance tasks, complexity factors, essential questions, literature connections, and more.

VIDEO: Scope Time Machine: 1900-1910
Transport students back to the era of the 1904 World’s Fair. Packed with information and vocabulary from the early 20th century, this video provides context for the story. Use these video-discussion questions to make connections between the video and the story.

ANALYZING CHARACTER/INFERENCE: Geneva and the Fair
Students analyze the story’s protagonist. Note: We’ve provided two versions of this activity: CLOSE-READING AND CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
For print or projection. These questions also appear in the Lesson Plan.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the story and informational text. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Click here to learn more about Scope Vocabulary.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these multiple-choice and short-answer questions based on state and PARCC assessments. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
Students explore character, elements of plot, and more in this self-guided activity. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource that your students can use all year!

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students explain how going to the 1904 World’s Fair affected Geneva in “Electric Summer” and whether a world’s fair would have the same impact on kids today. Click here to learn more about our contests.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS STORY
Get them all in one click!


Welcome to the Future

SUMMARY: Throughout history, humans have been making predictions about the future. What do these predictions reveal about us? This fun and engaging package includes an article predicting life in 2113, a primary document from 1900, and an original poem. Featured Skill: Inference

For the complexity factors of these articles, including Lexile score, see page T-14 of your Teacher's Guide.

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S GUIDE LESSON PLAN.
Includes step-by-step lesson plan, differentiated performance tasks, complexity factors, essential questions, literature connections, and more.

AUDIO: “What is yet to be is but a guess . . .”
Hear Rebecca Kai Dotlich’s lovely poem read aloud. Click here to find more audio articles.

INFERENCE: Analyze the Predictions
This activity requires students to make inferences and think critically about the predictions in the two articles.

CLOSE-READING AND CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
For print or projection. These questions also appear in the lesson plan.

POETRY ANALYSIS
Short-answer questions help students analyze Rebecca Kai Dotlich’s poem.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the paired texts. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Click here to learn more about Scope Vocabulary.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these multiple-choice and short-answer questions based on state and PARCC assessments. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Using details from all three texts, students explain what our visions of the future reveal about our values, worries, hopes, and dreams. Click here to learn more about our contests.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THESE TEXTS
Get them all in one click!


Should Everyone Get a Trophy?

SUMMARY: These days, many kid athletes get rewarded simply for showing up to practices and games. Should trophies go only to the best players? Students read arguments on both sides of the debate then take a stand. Skill focus: Supporting an argument; identifying central ideas and details; essay writing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

GUIDED WRITING: The Argument Essay
Our self-guided activity sheet makes essay writing a painless process. Great for homework!

GREAT TRANSITIONS HANDOUT
Using transitions effectively is a key—and often challenging—writing skill. Our handout gives students ideas on how to choose the perfect transition word or phrase.


Is That Rock Alive?

SUMMARY: Students correct grammatical errors and revise sloppy writing in a short nonfiction article about Death Valley’s mysterious “sailing stones,” rocks that appear to move on their own. Skill focus: Conventions of standard English; revision

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

Please note: These activity sheets are print-only.

COLONS
Reinforcement for this key writing skill.

PARENTHESES
More practice using parentheses correctly.

PRONOUN-ANTECEDENT AGREEMENT
A practice activity to reinforce the rules of pronouns and antecedents—this issue’s Grammar Spotlight skill! Click here to download the grammar spotlight lesson.

SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT
Reinforcement for this key skill.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS ARTICLE.
Get them all in one click!


Rushing to the Rescue

SUMMARY: Students use our interview with 15-year-old Marcos Ugarte, who rescued his young neighbor from a burning house, to write their own articles. Key skills: Central idea and details; summarizing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

GUIDE TO “YOU WRITE IT” ACTIVITY
Our self-guided activity sheet walks students through the process of crafting an article.

“YOU WRITE IT” MODEL TEXT
Model the activity with an annotated example of a completed “You Write It.”

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
See our handy form to enter students’ work in the “You Write It” contest. Click here to learn more about our contests.


Grammar Has a Costume Party

SUMMARY: Students practice using who and whom while learning about the extremely elaborate costumes and makeup worn by stars of three recent blockbusters. Key skills: Understanding who vs. whom; conventions of standard English

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

WHO VS. WHOM
More practice with these commonly confused words.


Whole-Issue Review

READING-COMPREHENSION CROSSWORD PUZZLE
This is a fun way to test students’ understanding of the whole issue. Please note: This activity is print-only.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITY SHEETS FROM THIS ISSUE.
Get them all with one simple click. Please note: The activities in this file are print-only.

SCOPE’S SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
Visit our library for a list of basic skills activities for just about any Scope article or story, along with a collection of handy handouts.

ANSWER KEY
Looking for answers? Visit our top-secret website for answers to all quizzes and activities. The URL can be found on page T-3 of your printed Teacher’s Guide.

MORE HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS
TEACHER’S GUIDE

Misplaced your TG? No worries! Download it here. Note: This online version does NOT include the answer key or the URL for the answer key.

COMMON CORE, NCTE, AND IRA STANDARDS
How this issue of Scope supports these standards.

FAQs ABOUT INTERACTIVE PDFs
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