You Write It Contest Winners

Congratulations to the winners of our You Write It Contest in the October 22, 2012, issue. We couldn’t have written these articles better ourselves!

Click here to read the You Write It interview that inspired these articles.

Check out the winning entries below:

“This Is What I’m Meant to Do”

Clare D.
Kissimmee, FL

Sometimes, adults doubt kids because they don’t think we can truly make a difference. What they don’t realize is that even though we’re young, we can still help. A great example would be one of my inspirations, Kolbey Watford. Kolbey is only 17, and he’s a volunteer firefighter!

Being a volunteer firefighter is a difficult job, especially when someone you know gets hurt. “One night, two of my friends hit a pothole,” Kolbey said. “Their truck flipped six times, and they were both ejected . . . All I thought about was helping them. You have to focus and move past the fact that they’re your friends.”

Kolbey helps from the outside of burning buildings. He shuttles in water from the truck, refills the truck at fire hydrants, and helps change oxygen cylinders.

Although Kolbey can’t go into burning buildings until he’s 18, he can still practice. He practices inside with controlled fires and rescues a 200-pound dummy. He said, “It was so dark and smoky you couldn’t see anything.” He wasn’t even scared. He said, “I got a rush. I felt like ‘This is what I’m meant to do.’” Although Kolbey is only 17, he can do a lot and make a difference. It is truly what he’s meant to do.

Jacie L.
New Britain, CT

Have you ever gotten a rush of excitement knowing that you were meant to do something? Have you ever felt like it was your destiny? What if I tell you that a 17-year-old kid, Kolbey Watford, found his passion at such a young age?

When Kolbey was a little kid, he often saw his dad working as a fireman. When you’re 5 or 6 years old and you see your mom or dad doing something, you would want to do that too, right? That’s what Kolbey did. As he grew older, he took an EMS class so he and his father could work together. Though Kolbey is only 17, he can do more than people expect. Though the law prevents someone Kolbey’s age from actually entering burning buildings; he must help from the outside. Kolbey says, “We were called to a house that was completely engulfed in flames. I shuttled in water from the truck, refilled the truck at a fire hydrant, and helped the other firefighters change their oxygen cylinders.”

Firemen don’t just respond to fires. They respond to many different types of emergencies, like car accidents. One night, Kolbey’s team was called to a car accident where a truck had flipped six times and both passengers were ejected from the car. Kolbey soon found out that two of his friends were driving the truck. “All I thought about was helping them. You have to focus and move past the fact that they’re your friends. They were both OK, though one had a concussion, and the other had a fractured leg.”

If you saw two of your friends get hurt like that, how would you feel? Kolbey gets a rush, like this is what he’s meant to do. “It takes a lot [to do this job],” he explains, “You have to know how fires behave. It takes strength, focus, and endurance.”

Never does Kolbey doubt that he can do something because of his age. He’s actually the perfect age to start. Learning young can only have positive effects.

Rhyan B.
Lindsay, TX

One night, two kids were driving down the road when . . . BAM! They hit a pothole! Their truck flipped six times and both kids were ejected. A 17-year-old boy named Kolbey Watford came to help. He was just doing his job when he found that it was his friends. All Kolbey thought about “was helping them.” He says, “You have to focus and move past the fact that they’re your friends.” Though one had a concussion and the other a fractured leg, both of Kolbey’s friends were OK.

Kolbey Watford, a 17-year-old from Andrews, South Carolina, is a volunteer firefighter. Kolbey trained in a fire and EMS class. Now he fights fires with his dad, who has been a volunteer firefighter for a long time.

By law, Kolbey is required to remain outside of burning buildings. When he is 18, he can go into the buildings. Kolbey gave an example of how he helps from the outside. He said, “We were called to a house that was completely engulfed in flames. I shuttled in water from the truck, refilled the truck at a fire hydrant, and helped the other firefighters change their oxygen cylinders.”

Kolbey’s responsibilities include getting victims to the ambulance and helping get whatever the other firefighters need. Kolbey says, “It takes a lot [to do this job]. You have to know how fires behave. It takes strength, focus, and endurance.” Sometimes his friends have doubted him saying, “You’re only 17. What can you do?” He tells them that he “can do a lot!”

Even though Kolbey is only 17, he can do a lot. To quote Les Brown, “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss you’ll land among the stars.”

 

Help | Privacy Policy
EMAIL THIS

* YOUR FIRST NAME ONLY

* FRIEND'S FIRST NAME ONLY

* FRIEND'S EMAIL ADDRESS

MESSAGE
Here's something interesting from Scholastic.com


Scholastic respects your privacy. We do not retain or distribute lists of email addresses.