Scholastic Scope | Scholastic.com

October 22, 2012

 

SCOPE ONLINE
Skills-based reading and writing activities for each Scope article
Jump directly to an article’s resources:
NARRATIVE NONFICTION: The Orphan Train
PAIRED TEXTS: Does Fame Drive You Nuts?
READERS THEATER PLAY: Frankenstein
DEBATE/ESSAY KIT: Should We Bring Back the Woolly Mammoth?
THE LAZY EDITOR: Why Is That Guy in the Trash?
FICTION: Following Boo
YOU WRITE IT: “This Is What I’m Meant to Do”
GRAMMAR OVERREACTS: Affect vs. Effect
WHOLE-ISSUE REVIEW
ANSWER KEY
SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS

Great news! Most of our activity sheets are now writable PDFs. You can print and copy them or have students fill them out on their computers or tablets. Click here to see instructions for using writable PDFs.


The Orphan Train

SUMMARY: From 1854 to 1929, more than 200,000 orphaned or abandoned children were sent west on “orphan trains” in search of new homes. We pair this fascinating story with a profile of Michaela DePrince, who was adopted from war-torn Sierra Leone. Skill focus: compare and contrast; symbolism

Lexile Level: 930L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

COMPARE-AND-CONTRAST GRAPHIC ORGANIZER
Students use details from “The Orphan Train” and “Michaela, Triumphant” to compare and contrast Lee Nailling and Michaela DePrince.

READ, THINK, EXPLAIN: IDENTIFYING NONFICTION ELEMENTS

New and improved! Use our teacher-vetted, scaffolded reading activity to develop your students’ nonfiction reading skills and strategies and prepare them for higher-level thinking questions. Don’t miss the nifty glossary of terms we’ve added at the end of the activity!

VOCABULARY

A list of tricky words that appear in the article. Includes definitions and example sentences, as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPRENSION QUIZ

A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students write a paragraph comparing and contrasting Lee Nailling and Michaela DePrince. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCES
PRIMARY DOCUMENT: Orphan Train Advertisement
This ad ran in the Tecumseh Chieftain, a Nebraska newspaper, on July 8, 1893. Project it for your students and ask them to analyze it: What is the tone of the ad? Based on this ad, do you think the newspaper editor mentioned in the article was right when he compared the selection process to “picking out cattle”? Why or why not?

VIDEO: CNN Interview With Orphan-Train Rider
This segment from CNN features clips from a 2008 interview with one of the last surviving orphan-train riders. Share this with your class for another perspective on the orphan-train era. Length: 2:41.

VIDEO: ABC News Profile of Michaela DePrince
This inspiring ABC News segment features Michaela discussing her adoption, her success as a young ballerina, and the challenges she still faces. Length: 5:36. NOTE: An ad appears before the video begins, so we recommend loading and previewing the video before your class starts.


Does Fame Drive You Nuts?

SUMMARY: Why has Justin Bieber been acting so strange lately? It might be because fame isn’t all it’s cracked up to be—at least according to our essay and Emily Dickinson’s classic poem “Nobody.” Skill focus: tone/author’s point of view

CLICK HERE TO SEE WHY THIS IS OUR FAVORITE COMMON CORE ACTIVITY OF THE ISSUE!

Lexile Level: 1230L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

THEMED VOCABULARY: Fame
This not-to-be-missed activity will help your students learn content-area vocabulary for the topic of fame, and understand how a writer’s word choice communicates his or her point of view. Great for whole-class and small-group work. Click here for an interactive Teacher’s Guide to using this activity. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

AUTHOR’S POINT OF VIEW
Students analyze the author’s point of view and the poet’s point of view, considering word choice, tone, and what information is included and excluded. Makes excellent preparation for the writing prompt on page 13.

AUDIO: Reading of “Nobody”
Play our dramatic reading of the poem for listening-comprehension practice. Tip: Before playing our reading, have several students each read the poem aloud. Compare how the tone and mood of the poem change depending on how it’s read.

POETRY ANALYSIS: “Nobody”
Multiple-choice and short-answer questions help students understand Emily Dickinson’s poem. Please note: This activity sheet is print-only.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students analyze the author of the article’s attitude toward fame and compare it to that of the speaker in Emily Dickinson’s “Nobody.” Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
POET BIOGRAPHY: Emily Dickinson
A biography of the beloved poet from the Emily Dickinson Museum’s website.


Frankenstein

SUMMARY: Our awesomely creepy adaptation of Mary Shelley’s classic novel is a fun Halloween treat. The story of a scientist and his tragically misunderstood creature will prompt lively discussion in your classroom: Who is the REAL monster in this tale? Skill focus: text analysis

GET A PDF OF THIS PLAY TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

DIGITAL LESSON PLAN: Pairing Frankenstein With Our Cloning Debate
Use our step-by-step multimedia teaching package for a showstopping lesson that connects Frankenstein with this issue’s debate, “Should We Bring Back the Woolly Mammoth?”

SCOPE VIDEO: The Electrifying Age of Frankenstein
Our video will give your students a snapshot of the thrilling (and slightly terrifying) scientific advancements that were happening in Mary Shelley’s day.
For an iPad/iPhone compatible version of this video, please click here.

FINDING TEXT EVIDENCE: “Who’s the Monster?”
Students identify evidence from the play supporting arguments about who is responsible for the creature’s crimes.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
Students explore character, elements of plot, and more, in this self-guided activity. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource your students can use all year!

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the play. Includes definitions and example sentences, as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Who is ultimately at fault for the creature’s murders in Frankenstein? Is it the creature? Dr. Frankenstein? Society? Students take a position and support their argument using evidence from the play. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
ORIGINAL TEXT: Frankenstein
The full text of Mary Shelley’s classic novel is available for free online. Share it with your above-level students and challenge them to think about how our adaptation is different from the original.


Should We Bring Back the Woolly Mammoth?

SUMMARY: Scientists are trying to clone a woolly mammoth, an extinct species. Is this a good idea? Students read arguments on both sides of the debate, then take a stand. Skill focus: supporting an argument; identifying main ideas and details

Lexile Level: 990L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

DIGITAL LESSON PLAN: Pairing Frankenstein With Our Cloning Debate
Use our step-by-step multimedia teaching package to teach a showstopping lesson connecting this debate to our Readers Theater Play Frankenstein.

GUIDED WRITING: The Argument Essay
Our self-guided worksheet makes essay writing a painless process. Great for homework!

GREAT TRANSITIONS HANDOUT
Using transition words is a key writing skill. Our handout gives students ideas on how to choose the perfect transition word.

ARGUMENT-ESSAY CHECKLIST
Have students use our nifty list to check their argument essays before handing them in. Great for peer review too!

DIY VOCABULARY
This activity helps students keep track of unfamiliar words they encounter in any Scope article. They will use context clues, look up definitions, and use each new word in a sentence. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.


Why Is That Guy in the Trash?

SUMMARY: Students correct grammatical errors and revise sloppy writing in a nonfiction article about “freegans,” people who reduce waste by scouring dumpsters for edible food. Skill focus: conventions of standard English; revision

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

CORRECT PLACEMENT OF MODIFIERS
Students identify and revise sentences containing misplaced modifiers.

SENTENCE-STRUCTURE VARIATION PRACTICE
Tips—plus an activity for practice in varying sentence structures.

WORD-VARIATION PRACTICE
This activity helps students use a wider vocabulary in their writing.

COMMA USE
Students review the rules, then practice. Please note: This activity sheet is print-only.

AVOIDING REDUNDANCY
Redundant words and phrases are common in writing. Help students recognize and avoid them!


Following Boo

SUMMARY: While on a family vacation in Florida, Nate meets Boo, a mysterious dog with a strange secret. We pair Bobbie Pyron’s poignant story about life and death with a short informational text about the legend of the Fountain of Youth. Skill focus: analyzing theme

Lexile Level: 840L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
This self-guided activity helps students explore character, elements of plot, and more. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms —a terrific resource your students can use all year!

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

DIY VOCABULARY
This activity is a great way for students to keep track of unfamiliar words they encounter in any Scope article. They will use context clues, look up definitions, and use each new word in a sentence. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
MEET THE AUTHOR: Bobbie Pyron
Learn more about Bobbie Pyron, the wonderful author of “Following Boo.”


“This Is What I’m Meant to Do”

SUMMARY: Kolbey Watford, 17, is a volunteer firefighter in his hometown of Andrews, South Carolina. In this activity, students use our interview with Kolbey to write a short article about him. Skill focus: identifying main idea and details; summarizing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

GUIDE TO “YOU WRITE IT” ACTIVITY
Our self-guided worksheet walks students through the process of crafting an article.

“YOU WRITE IT” MODEL TEXT
Model the activity with an annotated example of a completed “You Write It” article.

PUNCTUATING QUOTATIONS
Use this activity sheet for extra practice with direct quotes. Please note: this activity sheet is print-only.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Use our handy form to enter students’ work in the “You Write It” contest. Read more about our contests here.


Grammar Overreacts

SUMMARY: Students practice the correct use of affect and effect while learning about three scary-looking but perfectly harmless creatures. Skill focus: affect and effect

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

AFFECT VS. EFFECT
More practice with these commonly confused words.


Whole-Issue Review

READING-COMPREHENSION CROSSWORD PUZZLE
This is a fun way to test students’ understanding of the whole issue. Please note: This activity is print-only.

SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
Visit our library for a list of basic skills activities for just about any Scope article or story.

ANSWER KEY
Looking for answers? Visit our top-secret website for answers to all quizzes and activities. The URL can be found on page T-3 of your printed Teacher’s Edition.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITY SHEETS FROM THIS ISSUE
Access them all with one simple click.

MORE HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS
TEACHER’S EDITION

Misplaced your TE? No worries! Download it here. Note: This online version does NOT include the answer key or the URL for the answer key.

COMMON CORE, NCTE, AND IRA STANDARDS
How this issue of Scope aligns with these standards.

FAQs ABOUT INTERACTIVE PDFS
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