Digital Lesson Plan

Step-by-step, whiteboard ready

October 22, 2012, Issue
Frankenstein: What Could Go Wrong?
Explore our featured skill using a Scope article, video, activity sheets, and more.
Great for meeting Common Core State Standards.

Featured Skill: synthesizing information from multiple texts; focused research

Summary:
This step-by-step, multimedia package is the perfect cross-curricular teaching kit. After watching a video that provides historical and scientific context to Mary Shelley’s era, students read and discuss Scope’s adaptation of Frankenstein. Next, students take their own position in the modern scientific dispute of cloning, supporting their argument with evidence from our debate, “Should We Bring back the Woolly Mammoth?” Synthesizing information from the play, the debate, and their own research, students then formulate a set of guidelines on responsible scientific research.

Main objectives:
• to read a play that examines one scientist’s responsibilities
• to read a debate and other texts that raise questions about cloning
• to form opinions using text evidence and participate in a class discussion
• to analyze information in a culminating activity

Note: This step-by-step lesson plan is an interactive PDF that includes embedded links to everything you will need. To use these embedded links, you need Adobe Acrobat Reader software. Download it free here. If you can’t use the embedded links, click the links below instead.

Materials:
• October 22, 2012, issue of Scope
• digital versions of Frankenstein and “Should We Bring Back the Woolly Mammoth?” to project
Scope video “The Electrifying Age of Frankenstein
Scope activity sheet “Critical-Thinking Questions”
Answer key

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