April 8, 2013

 

SCOPE ONLINE
Skills-based reading and writing activities for each Scope article
Jump directly to an article’s resources:
NARRATIVE NONFICTION: The Boys Who Fought
the Nazis

READERS THEATER PLAY: Oz the Great and Powerful
PAIRED TEXTS: Goat Cheese and Big Macs
DEBATE/ESSAY KIT: Is Bottled Water Really Better?
FICTION: Girl Can’t Dance
THE LAZY EDITOR: Hello? Hello?
YOU WRITE IT: Crusading for Chickens
GRAMMAR GETS STYLED: Complement vs. Compliment
WHOLE-ISSUE REVIEW
ANSWER KEY
SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS

Great news! Most of our activity sheets are now writable PDFs. You can print and copy them or have students fill them out on their computers or tablets. Click here to see instructions for using writable PDFs.


The Boys Who Fought the Nazis

SUMMARY: This is the incredible true story of three German teenagers who risked their lives creating and distributing anti-Hitler and anti-Nazi leaflets during World War II. Don’t miss our “Behind the Scenes” video. Skill focus: central idea

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

DIGITAL LESSON PLAN: “Fighting the Nazis”
Explore the power of information and propaganda in Nazi Germany with this engaging multimedia lesson. Our step-by-step teaching package connects the article, Scope “Behind the Scenes” video, a slide show, activity sheets, and more.

FOR TEACHERS: Strategies for Teaching About the Holocaust
We consulted with experienced educators to create this one-page guide, offering some strategies to consider as you tackle this difficult topic in your classroom.

VIDEO: Behind the Scenes
Author Kristin Lewis gives students an inside look at the research, writing, and design process in the creation of “The Boys Who Fought the Nazis.” Provides context and key vocabulary, and sets a purpose for reading.

AUDIO: Hear the article read aloud.
A great way to make a “stretch text” accessible for your below-level readers. Also makes superb listening-comprehension practice for your entire class. Find more audio articles here.

CENTRAL IDEA: “The Power of Information”
Students identify text evidence to support a central idea of the article. Great preparation from the writing prompt on page 10. Note: This is a challenging activity, so we’ve provided two versions: INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

READ, THINK, EXPLAIN: IDENTIFYING NONFICTION ELEMENTS
Use our teacher-vetted, scaffolded reading activity to develop your students’ nonfiction-reading skills and strategies, and prepare them for higher-level-thinking questions and class discussion. Makes great homework too. Don’t miss our nifty Glossary of Nonfiction Terms—an excellent resource that students can use all year long.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the article. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students consider the power of information in Nazi Germany. Read more about our contests here.

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EXTRA RESOURCES
VIDEO: Introduction to World War II and the Holocaust (Animated Map)
A narrated “animated map” from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum provides an overview of the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. An excellent additional resource for advanced students interested in learning more about the war. Length: 6:34. Note: Please preview the video to ensure it is appropriate for your students.

RECOMMENDED READING: Hitler Youth by Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Bartoletti’s impeccably researched nonfiction book about the Hitler Youth (suggested for ages 12 and up) is a masterpiece.


Oz the Great and Powerful

SUMMARY: This rollicking adaptation of the new movie, a prequel to L. Frank Baum’s classic novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, tells the story of how circus magician Oscar Diggs became the mighty Wizard of Oz. Paired with a profile of Baum. Essential question: What is greatness?

GET A PDF OF THIS PLAY TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
Students explore character, elements of plot, and more in this self-guided activity. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource that your students can use all year!

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the play. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students compare the author L. Frank Baum with his character the Wizard of Oz. Read more about our contests here.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS PLAY
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EXTRA RESOURCES
OFFICIAL MOVIE WEBSITE: Oz the Great and Powerful
Learn more about the movie our play is based on at its official website. Tip: Play the movie trailer before you perform the play.

VIDEO: The Characters of Oz
A clip from the Smithsonian Channel on Baum and his inspirations. Perfect complement to the author profile on page 16. Length: 1:39. Note: Ads may appear on the page. We recommend loading and previewing the video before your class begins.


Goat Cheese and Big Macs

SUMMARY: No country is more famous for its fancy cuisine than France. So why does McDonald’s do so well there? An article about how the fast-food giant has adapted to the French palate and customs is paired with a newspaper article about the controversy over opening a McDonald’s in Oaxaca, Mexico. Skill focus: key ideas and details

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS
Students synthesize key ideas from the two articles in preparation for responding to the writing prompt on page 19.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the paired texts. Includes definitions and example sentences as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students describe the strategies McDonald’s uses to attract customers in other countries, as well as the cultural traditions that, some contend, McDonald’s could threaten. Read more about our contests here.

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Is Bottled Water Really Better?

SUMMARY: Americans buy approximately 30 billion bottles of water each year. Some say bottled water is healthy and convenient, but is it worth the cost? Students read arguments on both sides of the debate, then take a stand. Perfect for Earth Day. Skill focus: forming an opinion; identifying central ideas and details; argument writing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

THEMED VOCABULARY: Words Associated With the Environment
Explore environmental vocabulary in this fun and engaging activity. Great for whole-class and small-group work. Includes great tie-ins for Earth Day. Click here for an interactive Teacher’s Guide for help using this activity. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

GUIDED WRITING: The Argument Essay
Our self-guided activity sheet makes essay writing a painless process. Great for homework!

GREAT TRANSITIONS HANDOUT
Using transitions effectively is a key and often challenging writing skill. Our handout gives students ideas on how to choose the perfect transition word or phrase.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS ARTICLE
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EDITOR’S TIP
Use our story to launch an extended Earth Day research project on the environmental impact of bottled water. Assign groups to do further investigation on the pros and cons of bottled water, culminating in an argument-writing activity or a class debate. Students may be inspired to start a campaign to raise awareness or seek to reduce bottled water waste at your school. Possible sources include:


Girl Can’t Dance

SUMMARY: Emma has always dreamed of being famous, and when a video of her goes viral, she finally gets her wish. But the celebrity lifestyle isn’t quite what she expected. Lisa Yee’s clever, funny story is paired with a profile of YouTube phenom Rebecca Black (remember “Friday”?). Skill focus: analyzing theme

GET A PDF OF THIS STORY TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. Visit our FAQ page.

NONINTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A printable version of the quiz above.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES
This self-guided activity helps students explore character, elements of plot, and more. Includes higher-level-thinking questions. Use this activity with our Glossary of Literary Terms—a terrific resource that your students can use all year!

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion.

DIY VOCABULARY
This activity is a great way for students to keep track of unfamiliar words they encounter in any Scope article or story. They will use context clues, look up definitions, and use each new word in a sentence. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students consider what the story and the profile of Rebecca Black say about fame today. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
MEET THE AUTHOR: Lisa Yee
Learn more about Lisa Yee and all her awesome books for young readers at her official website.


Hello? Hello?

SUMMARY: Students correct grammatical errors and revise sloppy writing in a nonfiction article about the history of the word hello. Skill focus: conventions of standard English; revision

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

Please note: These activity sheets are print-only.

PUNCTUATING QUOTATIONS
Reinforcement for this important skill.

MAINTAINING CONSISTENT VERB TENSE
Students practice fixing unnecessary tense shifts.

APOSTROPHE S
Review the rules, then practice.

USING COMMAS WITH INTRODUCTORY ELEMENTS
An introduction to using commas after introductions.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITIES FOR THIS ARTICLE
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Crusading for Chickens

SUMMARY: Students write a short article based on our interview with Orren Fox, a teen chicken farmer and blogger. Skill focus: identifying central idea and details; summarizing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
Note: this PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

GUIDE TO “YOU WRITE IT” ACTIVITY
Our self-guided worksheet walks students through the process of crafting an article.

“YOU WRITE IT” MODEL TEXT
Model the activity with an annotated example of a completed “You Write It” article.

PUNCTUATING QUOTATIONS
Use this activity sheet for extra practice with direct quotes.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Use our handy form to enter students’ work in the “You Write It” contest. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
ORREN’S BLOG: “Happy Chickens Lay Healthy Eggs”
Check out Orren’s website.


Grammar Gets Styled

SUMMARY: Students practice using complement and compliment correctly while admiring three spectacular hairstyles. Skill focus: complement vs. compliment

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied and will expire after one year.

COMPLIMENT VS. COMPLEMENT
More practice with these commonly confused words.


Whole-Issue Review

READING-COMPREHENSION CROSSWORD PUZZLE
This is a fun way to test students’ understanding of the whole issue. Please note: This activity is print-only.

DOWNLOAD ALL ACTIVITY SHEETS FROM THIS ISSUE
Get them all with one simple click. Please note: The activities in this file are print-only.

SCOPE’S SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
Visit our library for a list of basic skills activities for just about any Scope article or story, along with a collection of handy handouts.

ANSWER KEY
Looking for answers? Visit our top-secret website for answers to all quizzes and activities. The URL can be found on page T-3 of your printed Teacher’s Edition.

MORE HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS
TEACHER’S EDITION

Misplaced your TE? No worries! Download it here. Note: This online version does NOT include the answer key or the URL for the answer key.

COMMON CORE, NCTE, AND IRA STANDARDS
How this issue of Scope aligns with these standards.

FAQs ABOUT INTERACTIVE PDFs
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