Welcome to Honeyseed Farms!
Click each area of the map to explore the dairy farm! Each location has a fun fact and a question.
For each correct answer, you'll earn a unique badge. Collect all the badges and you'll earn the title Milk Genius!
Farmhouse
Fun fact
Why is protein so important at breakfast? Well, have you ever heard the saying that breakfast is the most important meal of the day? Eat a well-rounded breakfast with plenty of protein to help you accomplish your daily goals.
Question
In addition to protein, milk contains many other nutrients that your body needs, like vitamin D and calcium. How does calcium help keep you healthy?
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Calcium is necessary for strong bones and teeth. Dairy, kale, and sardines are good sources of calcium.
Barn
Fun fact
Not all food can be digested by humans, but that's no reason to waste it! Many farmers “recycle” the parts of foods that humans can't digest by giving them to animals who can digest them. For example, people can't digest the pulp and peels from oranges—but cows can! Other leftover food scraps are composted and used by farmers as fertilizer to help crops grow.
Question
Which of the following will you NOT find on any dairy farm?
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There is a lot of technology to make dairy farming more efficient, such as self-driving tractors and robotic milkers—but the cows themselves can't be replaced!
Road to dairy plant
Fun fact
Pasteurization is named after the scientist who invented the process, Louis Pasteur. In 1864, Pasteur discovered that heating up a liquid briefly (to 161 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 seconds) would kill any bacteria. This process is still used today to make sure that milk sold in stores will be safe for people to drink. It also helps the milk stay fresh longer. (Other products, such as eggs, may also be pasteurized in a similar way.)
Question
What happens to milk before it is transported from the farm to be pasteurized and prepared for drinking?
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An insulated truck keeps the milk fresh while it travels from the farm to the dairy plant.
Pasture
Fun fact
People can't eat hay—so why can cows? Well, cows are ruminants, which means that they digest food in a special way using their four stomach compartments. When a cow swallows its food, the food is stored in its first two stomachs. Later, the cow coughs up the food and chews it again, which is called “chewing the cud.” Finally, the cow can digest the food fully in its third and fourth stomachs.
Question
Which of the following statements is NOT true about cows?
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Cows actually sleep lying down! Farmers help take care of their other needs by milking them at the same time each day and keeping them cool with water misters and fans. Different-sounding moos can have different meanings.
Methane digester
Fun fact
Like all healthy animals, cows produce a lot of waste—literally tons of manure (that means poop!) each year. To help protect the environment, a machine called a methane digester takes cow manure and turns it into methane gas. This gas can then be burned to provide the farm with energy. Who knew that cow poop could be recycled?
Question
You are a dairy farmer. Which of the following could you use to make your farm more sustainable?
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Many dairy farmers use modern technology to get the energy and water they need from different sustainable sources.
Milking parlor
Fun fact
Milk contains many essential nutrients, including protein, potassium, and calcium. Calcium helps your body build strong bones and teeth, but your body needs a little help from vitamin D in order to absorb it. That's why it's handy that vitamin D is added to milk!
Question
You are a dairy farmer. One of your cows recently got sick, and the veterinarian gave her some antibiotics (a type of medicine). What should you do with the milk she produces?
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Farmers will dispose of any milk from animals that have received antibiotics to make sure that this medicine isn't in the milk that people drink. All milk has been tested to make sure it's free of antibiotics before it goes to the grocery store.
Honeyseed farms
You are a milk genius
Interactive Research Tool

Join Maya and Dave to learn about the scientific and technical processes behind milk's journey from the farm and why its nutrients matter.

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