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Lesson 1: P.E. Reed/Riser/Getty Images; Lesson 2: Masterfile;
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Lesson 7: I-Stockphoto; All other photos American Society of Hematology






About This Lesson Plan

SUBJECT
Biology and Life Science, Cells

GRADE
9-12

DURATION
2 Class Periods

COLLECTION
About Blood: Lesson Plans & DVD

Lesson 1: What Runs Through My Veins

Through this lesson, students will understand the components of blood, how to use a microscope, and the importance of stem cells.

OBJECTIVE
 • Become familiar with the components of blood
 • Understand the roles of the cellular components of blood
 • Use a compound light microscope to observe blood smears
 • Understand the role of stem cells in the production of RBCs (red blood cells)

MATERIALS
What Runs Through My Veins Student Worksheet 1
• pen
• paper
• prepared microscope slides of blood smears (or high-quality color photos)
compound light microscope (one for every one to two students)

DIRECTIONS

1. If students are not familiar with how to use a compound light microscope, conduct a pre-lesson in which students learn the parts of the microscope and observe microscope slides. Alternatively, guide them through a brief online demonstration at www.udel.edu/biology/ketcham/microscope/.
2. Instruct students on the components of blood and how blood cells form (hematopoiesis).
3. Use visuals to show the cellular components of blood, and ask students to compare and contrast their appearance and functions.
4. Observe blood smears using the 10X and 40X objective lenses of the compound light microscope.
5. Sketch observations and answer all questions on the student worksheet.

Extension Activities:
 • Show a film segment from the movie Osmosis Jones to supplement instruction on the immune response (www.imdb.com/title/tt0181739/plotsummary). 

• Have students complete all or part of The Case of Eric, Lou Gehrig’s Disease, and Stem Cell Research from the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, State University of New York (www.sciencecases.org/gehrigs_disease/gehrigs_disease.asp). Teachers can create an account for free to view the answer keys and teaching notes.

 

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