Source
Scholastic News Online

Scholastic News Online is a free resource with breaking news and highlights from the print magazine.

Available for grades 1-6, Scholastic News magazine brings high-interest current events and nonfiction to millions of classrooms each week.

Additionally, our subscribers have FREE access to Scholastic News Interactive, an exclusive online learning tool featuring digital editions, videos, interactive features, differentiated articles, and much more.


Tell Us What You Think
If you could send Elizabeth Eckford or any of the Little Rock Nine an email, what would you say?
50 Years Ago in Little Rock

50 Years Ago in Little Rock

In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that segregating black and white students in separate schools was unconstitutional. Arkansas continued to segregate schools until 1957, when nine black students attempted to attend the all-white Little Rock Central High School. Governor Orval E. Faubus called out the Arkansas National Guard to prevent them from entering.

In response, President Dwight D. Eisenhower ordered federal troops to Arkansas to enforce integration. After a period of crisis and adjustment, the schools integrated without further incident.

Scholastic News Online put together this collection of pictures and stories to commemorate the 50th anniversary of this fight for equality.

Articles

Enduring Legacy
Enduring Legacy
by Kathryn Llewellyn
Scholastic News Online | A student essay now part of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
<i>The Clinton 12</i>
The Clinton 12
by Aaron Broder
Scholastic Kids Press Corps | May18,2007
The Little Rock Nine were not the first black students to integrate a high school. Find out about The Clinton 12 and a new movie honoring their fight for equality in Tennessee.
Thank You, Ruby Bridges
Thank You, Ruby Bridges
Scholastic News Online | Students write letters to civil a rights hero
Privacy Policy
EMAIL THIS

* YOUR FIRST NAME ONLY

* FRIEND'S FIRST NAME ONLY

* FRIEND'S EMAIL ADDRESS

MESSAGE
Here's something interesting from Scholastic.com