About This Book

The Star-Spangled Banner

Author: Francis Scott Key

Illustrator: Peter Spier

Grade Level Equivalent: Pre-K-3

Age: 5-8


Genre: Song

Subject: American History, Flags, Monuments, Symbols, War of 1812

Lesson Plan for

The Star Spangled Banner Lesson Plan

This lesson plan was written to work in conjunction with the The Star-Spangled Banner by Francis Scott Key, illustrated by Peter Spier.

Themes: American History, Flags, Francis Scott Key, National Anthem, Patriotism
Grades: PreK-6
Summary
This is the story of the American victory during the war of 1812, set to the song created by Francis Scott Key. Detailed illustrations accompany the words of our national anthem.

The American flag, flying high over Fort McHenry, is shown in all its glory, reminding Americans of the battles fought and won to create the free nation that we are today.

Objectives

  • Children will become acquainted with the national anthem.
  • Children will learn that our flag is a symbol of freedom.
  • Children will enjoy seeing a familiar song come alive.
Reading Activities
Share the book The Star-Spangled Banner with children.

Then ask:
Where have you seen the American flag? What does it mean to you?

Show children an American flag. Discuss the meaning of the stars and stripes. Then supply twigs, kraft paper, crayons, and string that children can use to create their own American flags. Have children use the twigs to represent flag poles. The string will be used to attach the paper flags to "poles." Later, play some marching music. Have children wave their flags as they march in time to the music.

Give children an opportunity to sing a chorus of the "Star-Spangled Banner." After singing, have children talk about the meaning of the lyrics.

Help children understand that the flag is a symbol of freedom. Encourage children to think about other symbols they may be familiar with. You can offer help by asking children what they think of when they see McDonald's golden arches, or what a police officer's badge makes them think of. Then, give children an opportunity to create their own symbols with construction paper, scissors, glue, and crayons. When finished, let children describe what their symbols represent to their classmates.

Talk with children about the places they have seen the American flag. Then, show children photographs or illustrations of government buildings, monuments, school grounds, where the flag is flown. Encourage children to be on the lookout for this national symbol as they travel from place to place.

Attach an illustration or drawing of the American flag to a bulletin board or classroom wall. Then, have children describe the flag and the things it makes them think of. Have children write their thoughts about the flag in the form of simple poems. (Younger children can dictate their poems to you.) Display children's poetry on the bulletin board or wall surrounding the flag.

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