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Boston, Massachusetts (above) received two feet of snow and the state banned travel until roads could be cleared. (AP Photo / Gene J. Puskar)

A Big Blizzard

Winter Storm Nemo brings record-setting snowfall to the Northeast U.S.

By Jennifer Marino Walters | February 11 , 2013
<p>New York City (above) got less snow than many parts of the Northeast. (John Moore / Getty Images) </p>

New York City (above) got less snow than many parts of the Northeast. (John Moore / Getty Images)

Residents of the Northeast United States are recovering from a massive blizzard that struck on Friday night and lasted into Saturday afternoon, dumping large amounts of snow on the region and bringing hurricane-force winds. Winter Storm Nemo, which stretched from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic, resulted in 11 people dead and left about 650,000 homes and businesses without power. In addition, nearly 5,800 flights were canceled throughout the region.

Connecticut got hit especially hard. The town of Hamden received the largest amount of snowfall—40 inches—while New Haven got nearly three feet. President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency for the state, meaning federal aid can be used to help with the recovery.

In New York, police had to rescue fire trucks, ambulances, snowplows, and cars that got stuck on a highway in Long Island, parts of which got as much as two-and-a-half feet of snow. Massachusetts enforced its first travel ban on roads since a 1978 blizzard. (Boston got about two feet of the white stuff, making this the fifth-worst storm ever recorded in the city.) Portland, Maine, got a record snowfall of 31.9 inches. New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Vermont also received large amounts of snow.

DIGGING OUT

As quickly as the storm blew through, residents and emergency crews began to clean up. More than 800 National Guard soldiers and airmen provided roadway support, emergency transportation, and other assistance in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York.

By Sunday evening, significant progress had been made. All of the major airports were open again (though many flights were still delayed or canceled). Power had been restored to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses, and travel bans in Connecticut and Massachusetts were lifted. But nearly 300,000 homes and businesses were still without power, and some schools throughout the region said they would remain closed on Monday.

Nemo added to the list of extreme weather events that have occurred in the U.S. in the past year—Hurricane Sandy, drought, and wildfires. It was also the hottest year on record.

While the Northeast continues to bounce back from the blizzard, other areas can expect extreme winter weather in the coming days. The National Weather Service forecast a major winter storm would hit from Colorado to Minnesota on Sunday into Monday, bringing heavy snow and strong winds.

Check out the Scholastic News Kids Press Corps for more coverage of Winter Storm Nemo.

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