Source
Administrator Magazine
Scholastic Administrator is a must-read resource for 240,000 of today's results-driven school leaders. Every issue features leadership for education executives, insight and analysis into what's next in education, and reporting on cutting-edge technologies in real life applications.

Right Motivation

Games can be great for learning, but watch the rewards.

Video games are an integral part of a gamified classroom. There are several top education-oriented games, including Refraction, a free online puzzle that is not obviously a lesson in fractions. Refraction lets teachers watch students’ progress on their computers to see what concepts the students understand, according to the Center for Game Science at the University of Washington, which produced the game.

Scratch is a programming language that gives users the ability to create their own interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art—and share their work on the Web. It was developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab. Director Mitchel Resnick says he is “a strong supporter of creating environments that would be appealing for kids, and strongly supportive of the trend to find ways to help kids become deeply engaged and learn in the process.” However, Resnick is not a proponent of gamification in the classroom, saying he views it as placing too much emphasis on incentives and rewards in support of the learning process. “Learning should not be turned into a game,” he maintains. Research has shown that emphasizing short-term, intrinsic rewards that are separate from core learning motivates kids to focus only on the reward rather than the ideas themselves, Resnick says.

“Giving prizes means … oftentimes they won’t get motivated to learn on their own. It doesn’t develop their curiosity and thirst for becoming lifelong learners, and I think that’s more important than anything else in school.”

Kids get motivated by sharing their work with one another, Resnick says. “We don’t give rewards because we think that would be counterproductive. We focus on kids having playful engagement and being deeply engaged, but as an active participant by sharing their work and getting feedback from others.”

Initially, Scratch was used primarily by young people at home and in after-school centers. Now, it is used more ­frequently in schools. One of Resnick’s grad students started a site called ScratchEd, for educators, and more than 5,000 educators have registered for it (scratched.media.mit.edu). The lab was surprised to learn that Scratch is also used in the introductory computer science programs at Harvard, UC Berkeley, and Rutgers, among other universities. But Resnick expects it’s because Scratch “provides a very clear way of understanding core concepts of computer science.” While other institutions and companies are making games and apps that help kids learn, the Media Lab designs tools for kids to make their own games, stories, and animation. “We think the richest part of the learning experience is when you’re doing the creating,” Resnick says.

—Winter 2013—

  • Teacher Store
  • The Teacher Store  
    Bicycle Book

    Bicycle Book

    by Gail Gibbons

    In an engaging picture book, Gibbons introduces the bicycle: its history, design, care, types, uses, and safety rules. A brief history, helpful descriptions of different parts, basic mechanics, functionality, maintenance, and safety are all included. Large, clear ink drawings with colorful washes and shading illustrate this satisfying book.

    $2.77 You save: 30%
    Paperback Book | Grades 1-3
    Add To Cart
    Educators Only
    Bicycle Book
    Grades 1-3 $2.77
    Add To Cart
  • Teacher Store
  • The Teacher Store  
    Core Clicks

    Core Clicks

    Visit www. scholastic.com/coreclicks for more information.
    Core Clicks®is an exciting yearlong instructional program created by Scholastic News®and Weekly Reader® in consultation with literacy expert Dr. Nell K. Duke. Designed to meet higher academic standards, this online program features 120 fully interactive informational texts with videos, performance tasks, discussion prompts, and so much more built right in!
    Each interactive text helps teachers develop one of the 13 most important close reading skills required by higher academic standards. Teachers use our simple interface to guide whole classes or small groups through each text three times, going more deeply into the ELA skill with each encounter.

    Core Clicks also features a variety of invaluable assessment and reporting tools to help educators adequately prepare their students for higher-level assessments.
    The Core Clicks Online Close Reading Program features:
    120 Text Studies
    Multimedia instructional units build close reading and analysis skills through multiple encounters with exciting nonfiction texts
    • 20 text studies per grade level, 120 total ( K–5 )


    20 Skill Videos
    Direct instruction on ELA-aligned Spotlight Skills
    • Ten videos for grades K–2• Ten videos for grades 3–5

    33 Reading Checkpoints
    Performance-based assessment or skills practice with new texts• Four per grade level for K–2 (to be completed with teacher support ) • Seven per grade level for grades 3–5

    Core Clicks is searchable by skill, reading level, topic, and state or national standards?so it?s always easy to find the content you need!

    Core Clicks is web-based subscription. All you need is an internet connection. Once you?ve subscribed, you will be provided with a username and password and you simply log in at www. scholastic.com/coreclicks to begin using the program.

    $2,999.00
    Core Clicks | Grades K-5
    Add To Cart
    Educators Only
    Core Clicks
    Grades K-5 $2,999.00
    Add To Cart
Help | Privacy Policy
EMAIL THIS

* YOUR NAME

* YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS

* RECIPIENT'S EMAIL ADDRESS(ES)

(Separate multiple email addresses with commas)

Check this box to send yourself a copy of the email.

INCLUDE A PERSONAL MESSAGE (Optional)


Scholastic respects your privacy. We do not retain or distribute lists of email addresses.