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May 14, 2012

 

SCOPE ONLINE
Skills-based reading and writing activities for each Scope article
Jump directly to an article’s resources:
LITERARY NONFICTION: Dogs vs. Terrorists
ORIGINAL FICTION: Welcome to Anywhere
READERS THEATER PLAY: “Don’t Tell Me I Can’t”
PAIRED TEXTS: What If the Hunger Games Were Real?
DEBATE/ESSAY KIT: Is It OK to Sneak Food Into
the Movies?
THE LAZY EDITOR: Would You Surf This Wave?
YOU WRITE IT: Getting His Community Onboard
GRAMMAR GOES ON VACATION: Which vs. That

WHOLE-ISSUE REVIEW
ANSWER KEY
SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS


Dogs vs. Terrorists

SUMMARY: Since 9/11, the number of police dogs helping protect New York City has doubled. Our article takes an in-depth look at what makes dogs the ideal animal to sniff out bombs and chase down criminals. Skill focus: reading for information

Lexile Level: 1050L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

Or, take your lesson further with our exciting DIGITAL LESSON PLAN.

READING FOR INFORMATION: “Sniff Out the Details”
Students take note of important details in the text that support the idea that dogs are effective in law enforcement. Makes great scaffolding for the writing prompt on page 9.

PERSUASIVE WRITING: “How to Write a Persuasive Letter”

This step-by-step activity helps students craft a strong and effective letter in response to the writing prompt on page 9.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ

A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. (Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.) Get the noninteractive version here.

CRITICAL THINKING

Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion. These are also listed in our T.E.

IDENTIFYING NONFICTION ELEMENTS: READ, THINK, EXPLAIN

Use our teacher-vetted, scaffolded reading activity to help students improve their nonfiction reading-comprehension skills and strategies. Includes text-structure questions.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the article. Includes definitions and example sentences, as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students imagine being chief of police of their town and write a letter to the mayor arguing in favor of using police dogs. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
VIDEO: Canine Subway Police
This National Geographic clip will take your students on duty in the subway with an NYPD officer and his four-legged assistant. Students can use the video as an additional source for the writing activity on page 9. Length: 4:57. NOTE: An ad appears before the video begins, so we recommend loading the video before your class starts.


Welcome to Anywhere

SUMMARY: Roland Smith used the winning entry in our annual First-Line Contest to begin this story about a girl and her strange next-door neighbor. We’ve paired the story with one of our favorite poems, “Valentine for Ernest Mann” by Naomi Shihab Nye. Skill focus: character’s perspective

Lexile Level: 830L

GET A PDF OF THIS STORY TO PROJECT.
DOWNLOAD THE LESSON PLAN.

ANALYZING CHARACTER’S PERSPECTIVE: “The Way Madeline Sees It”
Students track how Madeline’s way of seeing the world changes over the course of the story.

POETRY QUIZ: “Valentine for Ernest Mann”

Students demonstrate mastery of the poem on page 16 with this multiple-choice and short-answer quiz.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ

A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests. (Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.) Get the noninteractive version here.

CRITICAL THINKING

Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion. These are also listed in our T.E.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES: “Back to Basics”

This self-guided activity helps students explore character, elements of plot, symbolism, and more. Includes higher-level-thinking questions.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students connect a quote from writer Henry Miller to the short story and the poem. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCES
WEB SITE: RolandSmith.com
Learn more about Roland Smith, the author of “Welcome to Anywhere,” by visiting his Web site.

POET SPOTLIGHT: Naomi Shihab Nye
Find a brief biography of Naomi Shihab Nye, author of “Valentine for Ernest Mann,” on her Poets.org page, which includes links to some of her other poems.


Don’t Tell Me I Can’t

SUMMARY: This biographical play tells the inspiring story of young Bessie Coleman, the first female African-American pilot. Skill focus: analyzing character

GET A PDF OF THIS PLAY TO PROJECT.
DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

ANALYZING CHARACTER: “Trailblazer”
This worksheet provides scaffolding for the writing prompt on page 27.

INTERACTIVE READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on those in state tests. (Need help with interactive PDFs? Visit our FAQ page.) Get the noninteractive version here.

CRITICAL THINKING
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion. These are also listed in our T.E.

IDENTIFYING LITERARY ELEMENTS AND DEVICES: “Back to Basics”
This self-guided activity helps students explore character, elements of plot, symbolism, and more. Includes higher-level-thinking questions.

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the play. Includes definitions and example sentences, as well as a practice activity to reinforce understanding. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Students explain a quote from President Woodrow Wilson and apply its central idea to the life of Bessie Coleman. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCES
VIDEO: Wright Brothers Are First in Flight
This History Channel clip tells the story of the Wright brothers, who, like Bessie Coleman, were trailblazers in early human flight. Ask students to compare the Wright brothers’ story with Bessie’s. Length: 3:06. NOTE: An ad appears before the video begins, so we recommend loading the video before your class starts.

VIDEO: Tuskegee Airman Luther Smith
Learn more about the history of the legendary Tuskegee Airmen in this interview with one of their pilots. Length: 3:35. NOTE: An ad appears before the video begins, so we recommend loading the video before your class starts.


What If the Hunger Games Were Real?

SUMMARY: Paired articles explore ancient Rome’s blood-and-gore-loving gladiator fans and today’s reality-TV audiences. Skill focus: comparing and contrasting; making connections between texts

Lexile Level: 900L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.

COMPARE-AND-CONTRAST QUIZ
Students analyze and compare the two texts through a series of multiple-choice questions. Makes excellent test prep.

COMPARE-AND-CONTRAST GRAPHIC ORGANIZER
This worksheet helps students identify the similarities and differences between gladiator battles and reality-TV shows.

EXTRA RESOURCE
MOVIE TRAILER: The Hunger Games
Check out the trailer for the new movie. How do the articles affect students’ understandings of this popular film? Length: 2:31. NOTE: An ad appears before this video begins, so we recommend loading it before your class starts. We also suggest previewing the trailer to ensure it is appropriate for your students.


Is It OK to Sneak Food Into the Movies?

SUMMARY: Movie-theater snacks are insanely expensive—but does that give us the right to bring our own? Students consider the arguments on both sides of this debate, then take a stand. Skill focus: supporting an argument; identifying main ideas and details

Lexile Level: 1000L

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.

GUIDED WRITING: THE PERSUASIVE ESSAY
Our self-guided worksheet makes essay writing a painless process. Includes two bonus handouts: transition words and a self-edit checklist. Great for homework!

EXTRA RESOURCE
VIDEO: High Movie Ticket, Food Prices: Man Fights Back
This ABC News clip reports on the court case filed against AMC. The case argues that their concession prices are too high. Do your students think this lawsuit is justified? Length: 1:53. NOTE:An ad appears before the video begins, so we recommend loading the video before your class starts.


Would You Surf
This Wave?

SUMMARY: Students correct grammar errors and revise sloppy writing in a nonfiction article about extreme surfers. Skill focus: conventions of standard English; revision

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.

USING COMMAS WITH INTRODUCTORY PHRASES
Students review the rules, then practice.

RAMBLING AND RUN-ON SENTENCES
More help with this common mistake.

CONSISTENT TONE AND STYLE
Sometimes slangy language, like, so totally doesn’t belong, yo.

MODIFIERS
Students rework sentences with dangling and misplaced modifiers.

VERB TENSE
Make your students’ present verb-tense confusion a thing of the past.


Getting His Community Onboard

SUMMARY: Students write a short article based on our interview with 18-year-old Victor Davila, the co-founder of an environmental-education program. Skill focus: identifying main idea and details; summarizing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.

GUIDE TO “YOU WRITE IT” ACTIVITY
This step-by-step worksheet helps students use our interview to craft an article. Includes guidance for identifying the main idea, organizing, and using direct quotations.

“YOU WRITE IT” MODEL TEXT
Our annotated example of a completed “You Write It” activity is another great way to help students understand how to turn an interview into an article.

PUNCTUATING QUOTATIONS
Use this activity from our archives to help students correctly punctuate the direct quotes they include in their articles.

CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Use our handy form to enter students’ work in the “You Write It” contest. Read more about our contests here.

EXTRA RESOURCE
WEB SITE: Victor Davila, Brower Youth Awards 2011 Winner
Learn more about Victor at the Brower Youth Awards Web site. The page features two YouTube videos: a background video on Eco Ryders and a clip of Victor’s acceptance speech.


Grammar Goes on Vacation

SUMMARY: Students practice the correct uses of which and that while reading fun facts about three popular vacation spots. Skill focus: which and that

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT.

WHICH VS. THAT
More practice with these tricky words.


Whole-Issue Review

READING-COMPREHENSION CROSSWORD PUZZLE
This is a fun way to test students’ understanding of the whole issue.

VOCABULARY REVIEW 3
The third and final installment of our popular vocabulary-review series is here! Features a list of, and review activities for, ALL 80 words from four issues of the 2011–2012 school year: 2/20, 3/12, 4/02, and 4/23. Read more about Scope Vocabulary here.

SKILLS AND GRAPHIC-ORGANIZERS LIBRARY
Visit our library for a list of basic skills activities for just about any Scope feature.

ANSWER KEY
Looking for answers? Visit our top-secret Web site for answers to all reproducibles, quizzes, and activities. The URL is listed on page T-3 of your printed Teacher’s Edition.

DOWNLOAD ALL PRINTABLES FOR THIS ISSUE
Get it all with one simple click.

MORE HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS
TEACHER’S EDITION

Misplaced your TE? No worries! Download it here. Note: This online version does NOT include the answer key or the URL for the answer key.

COMMON CORE, NCTE, AND IRA STANDARDS
How your issue of Scope aligns with these standards.

FAQs ABOUT INTERACTIVE PDFS
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