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Earthquake Glossary

Click here to learn more about the disaster that struck Japan on March 11.

Earthquake – A natural event that occurs when huge pieces of Earth’s crust, called tectonic plates, interact with each other. Earthquakes occur along faults, or weak spots in Earth’s crust created by shifting plates. There is no way to stop an earthquake from occurring.

Tectonic plates – Giant interlocking slabs of rock that make up Earth’s rocky outer layer, or crust. As they move, the plates pull apart from, collide into, slide against, or slide over or under one another. Sometimes pressure builds up, causing pieces of the plates to shift, releasing energy that can cause the ground to shake violently. Plate movement can cause earthquakes as well as volcanic eruptions.

Epicenter – The point on Earth’s surface that is directly above where an earthquake started underground (called the focus or hypocenter). The epicenter of the recent Japanese earthquake was off the northeast coast of the Japanese island of Honshu. In general, areas closest to the epicenter of an earthquake sustain the most damage.

Tsunami – A series of giant powerful waves of seawater often caused by an earthquake under the seafloor. Earthquakes deep in the ocean cause most tsunamis. When the seafloor snaps up, it lifts a column of water above it. Gravity pulls the water back down, fanning waves outward. As the waves approach the shore, they grow in size. In Japan, a 23-foot wall of water swept onto the eastern coast, killing thousands of residents, flooding roadways, carrying away homes, cars, and boats.

Ring of Fire – The area along the edge of the Pacific Ocean where many tectonic plates meet. The islands of Japan are located in the Ring of Fire. Many of the world’s largest earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur in this area.

Magnitude – A measure of an earthquake’s strength. The intensity of an earthquake is measured on a scale from 0 to 10. Earthquakes that have a magnitude of 7.0 or higher are considered major quakes. The quake in Japan registered a magnitude of 9.0.

Aftershocks – Earthquakes, usually small ones, that follow major quakes. Aftershocks can continue for weeks, months, or years after the main quake. In the first few days after the Japanese earthquake, more than 100 aftershocks—ranging from 5.0 to 7.1 in magnitude—rocked the country.

Seismologist – A scientist who studies earthquakes.

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    Tsunamis

    Tsunamis

    by Jil Fine

    SET FEATURES:

    •     The ultimate series of "high-low" books for reluctant readers
    •     Clearly written, simple sentences
    •     Consistent, familiar vocabulary
    •     Sidebars
    •     User-friendly fact boxes, charts, and tables
    •     Where appropriate, some titles include timelines, equipment lists, safety tips, and maps

    •  
      REVIEWS:


       
      11/1/06 Booklist
      This entry follows other titles in the Natural Disaster series by covering not only the causes and effects of a catastrophe but also recovery efforts undertaken in its wake, and preventive measures taken later. Here, the author focuses on the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, which claimed more than 200,000 lives in more than two dozen countries. Between an account of the tsunami's disastrous course and a set of child-friendly Web sites and other resources, she discusses the range of geological events that cause such waves; the difficulties many affected countries had, first in warning coastal residents, then in coping with the damage; and, finally, the extent of early-detection instruments and strategies that have since been deployed. Enhanced by plenty of full-page color photos, plus advice for readers who live in susceptible areas, this study provides an unusual perspective on the tragedy, and so complements earlier books on the topic.

       

      $17.15 You save: 30%
      Library Binding | Grades 4-12
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    Grades 4-12 $17.15
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    Boom!

    Boom!

    by Howard Gutner

    Volcanoes don't erupt very often. But when they do, they make a mighty noise. Dramatic photographs and clearly detailed drawings bring the reality of a volcanic eruption to every early reader. A fact-filled book that is great for supporting social studies.

    $2.96 You save: 25%
    Paperback Book | Grades 2-3
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    Grades 2-3 $2.96
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