Source
Scholastic News Online

Scholastic News Online is a free resource with breaking news and highlights from the print magazine.

Available for grades 1-6, Scholastic News magazine brings high-interest current events and nonfiction to millions of classrooms each week.

Additionally, our subscribers have FREE access to Scholastic News Interactive, an exclusive online learning tool featuring digital editions, videos, interactive features, differentiated articles, and much more.


Multi-colored supernova gases Supernovas are brilliant balls of energy and light caused when stars explode. This photo rendering shows different hot gases left over from a supernova explosion. (NASA)

10-Year-Old Discovers Supernova

Canadian student becomes the youngest person to ever find an exploding star

By Larry Schwartz | January 10 , 2011
<br />Kathryn with her father's telescope.<br /><br />(David Smith / Canadian Press / AP Images)

Kathryn with her father's telescope.

(David Smith / Canadian Press / AP Images)

Not every 10-year-old can tell their classmates they discovered a supernova. But Kathryn Aurora Gray can!

The junior astronomer from New Brunswick, Canada, is the youngest person ever to discover a supernova.

"A supernova is a star that is blowing up," Kathryn explains. When a star runs out of fuel, it explodes into a massive ball of energy and light called a supernova. The explosion can last for several weeks. "Eventually, it will fade away," she says.

A FAMILY TRADITION

Kathryn has been looking up at the sky all her life. She and her dad are both amateur astronomers.

A few months ago, Kathyn's father Paul told her about Caroline Moore, a teenager from New York who found a supernova in 2008. President Obama was so impressed by Caroline's discovery that he invited her to visit the White House.

"If a 14-year-old can do it, I can do it," Kathryn told her dad.

SPOTTING STARS

Last week, Kathryn and her dad looked at photos their neighbor David Lane had taken. Lane is a fellow stargazer who owns the nearby Abbey Ridge Observatory.

He used a special telescope at the observatory to take pictures of the Camelopardalis constellation (a group of stars that people say look like something else, usually an animal or a famous person). Camelopardalis is the ancient Roman name for giraffe, which the stars look like from Earth.

Kathryn pointed out a very bright light in the constellation. Could it be a supernova? The team reported their discovery to the International Astronomical Union. They confirmed that Kathryn was the first person to spot SN 2010It.

Many people spend their lives hoping to discover a supernova. But Kathryn found one on her first try. "I was very excited to find one. Especially this quick," Kathryn says. "I hope to keep finding more supernovas."

Still, Kathryn has a little way to go to catch up to her dad. Her father has discovered seven supernovas!

KID REPORTER COVERAGE: Andrew Liang interviews Kathryn about her discovery.

  • Teacher Store
  • The Teacher Store  
    Lexile® Leveled Content Area Library, Interest Level: Intermediate, Levels 600–699

    Lexile® Leveled Content Area Library, Interest Level: Intermediate, Levels 600–699

    Increase the Informational Text in your classroom with this valuable collection designed to meet interests across all Lexile® measures.

    Organized by Lexile, this 20-book collection contains age-appropriate content-area trade books that students at different levels can read successfully and enjoy. This collection features high-interest science and social studies titles.


    See below for complete list of titles. Appropriate titles of equal value may be substituted if any of the listed titles are unavailable at shipping time.

    Title list:
    • Davy Crockett
    • Endangered Animals
    • Experiments with Plants
    • An Eye for Color
    • Fabulous Facts About the 50 States
    • The Great Kapok Tree
    • I Have a Dream
    • In Their Own Words: Thomas Edison
    • John, Paul, George & Ben
    • Komodo Dragon vs. King Cobra
    • More Than Anything Else
    • MSB Chapter Books: The Giant Germ
    • MSB Chapter Books: Voyage to the Volcano
    • Nat Geo Kids—Chapters: Dog Finds Lost Dolphins!
    • Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt
    • The Time Warp Trio: Knights of the Kitchen Table
    • The Time Warp Trio: See You Later, Gladiator
    • Titanic
    • A Whale Is Not a Fish
    • Who Was Babe Ruth?

    $79.00 You save: 31%
    Paperback Book Collection | Grades 3-5
    Add To Cart
    Educators Only
    Lexile® Leveled Content Area Library, Interest Level: Intermediate, Levels 600–699
    Grades 3-5 $79.00
    Add To Cart
  • Teacher Store
  • The Teacher Store  
    Guided Reading Content Areas: Level Z

    Guided Reading Content Areas: Level Z

    Strong reading skills are vital to every aspect of children’s education, and their reading abilities will affect their future achievement in science, social studies, and math. Guided Reading Content Areas helps you develop content-area knowledge while building reading skills, and provides access to a broad and exciting array of authentic texts.

    The program Features:
    • Titles aligned to content area standards in: Science–45%, Social Studies–40%, and Mathematics–15%.
    • Carefully leveled books that give students access to critical knowledge.
    • Lesson plans that develop important skills for reading informational text.
    • A Teacher's Guide co-authored by
    Dr. Gay Su Pinnell and Dr. Irene Fountas.

    Set Includes:
    • 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
    • Bat 6
    • Beyond Belief
    • The Disaster of the Hindenburg
    • Flight #116 Is Down*
    • The Greatest: Muhammad Ali
    • Guys Write for Guys Read
    • Memories of Vietnam
    • To Be a Slave*
    • We Shall Not Be Moved


    Visit the Scholastic Guided Reading Program website for more information.

    $359.95 You save: 25%
    Supplementary Collection | Grade 6
    Add To Cart
    Educators Only
    Guided Reading Content Areas: Level Z
    Grade 6 $359.95
    Add To Cart
Privacy Policy
EMAIL THIS

* YOUR FIRST NAME ONLY

* FRIEND'S FIRST NAME ONLY

* FRIEND'S EMAIL ADDRESS

MESSAGE
Here's something interesting from Scholastic.com