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The Scholastic Kids Press Corps is a team of about 50 Kid Reporters around the nation.  The interactive site brings daily news to life with reporting for kids, by kids.

Book Review: The Wimpy Kid Movie Diary

The book is out; DVD released August 3

By Kaj Lund Olsen | August 2 , 2010
Courtesy Amulet Books.
Courtesy Amulet Books.

The Wimpy Kid Movie Diary
Publisher/Release Date: Amulet Books; Mti edition/March 16, 2010
No. of Pages: 208
Reading level: Ages 9-12


The Wimpy Kid Movie Diary is not your usual wimpy book. It's not just a book based on the movie, but a great resource for those who want to know about making movies. It's also great for people who just want to read a good book.

With the release of the DVD of the movie version of The Diary of a Wimpy Kid set for August 3, now is a good time to check into this book. I was surprised that I couldn't put it down, enthralled from the beginning by the intertwining lives of the main character, both the one in the flesh, and the one on paper.

Actor Zach Gordon was born a month after the first doodle of cartoon character Greg Heffley was created. This book tells how they ended up in a movie together and "how a fictional cartoon character became a real boy."

Details and secrets of the moviemaking process are caught in the pages The Wimpy Kid Movie Diary. You meet the characters, and learn about blue screens and film editing. You get to see the filming locations and watch the tricks, like how they use stunt doubles and props. There are even funny cartoon strips added about back-stage life.

It isn't a novel that tells the movie's story, or a graphic novel, or even a nonfiction book about movie making. It's all that and more, starting with a normal kid and a wimpy doodle!

Be sure to check out Kid Reporter Christopher Gathers Cambell's review of the movie version of Diary of a Wimpy Kid!

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