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Scholastic Kids Press Corps
The Scholastic Kids Press Corps is a team of about 50 Kid Reporters around the nation.  The interactive site brings daily news to life with reporting for kids, by kids.

Join a Summit to Help Gorillas

Live web cast from Scholastic to discuss solutions

Members of the Scholastic Kids Press Corps, Grace Karemera, Joseph Mugisha, Georgette Munezero, Davis Higiro, Lya Ferrerrya, and Michael Carboni sign the Miza Kids Global Act Pact, as former President Bill Clinton, Author Dr. Paula Kahumbu, and Rwanda Minister for Culture and Sports Joseph Habaneza look on after a press conference in New York City, September 22, 2008. (Photo: Suzanne Freeman)<br />
Members of the Scholastic Kids Press Corps, Grace Karemera, Joseph Mugisha, Georgette Munezero, Davis Higiro, Lya Ferrerrya, and Michael Carboni sign the Miza Kids Global Act Pact, as former President Bill Clinton, Author Dr. Paula Kahumbu, and Rwanda Minister for Culture and Sports Joseph Habaneza look on after a press conference in New York City, September 22, 2008. (Photo: Suzanne Freeman)

Students from the New York area will meet on Friday to generate ideas and solutions to help save Africa's mountain gorilla population. Four Scholastic Kid Reporters from Rwanda are covering the event as well as are two U.S.-based Kid Reporters.
 
The six reporters met with former President Bill Clinton on Monday to sign a commitment of service to help save the gorillas' habitat. The Clinton Global Initiative is part of a group dedicated to that cause. The summit is being held in conjunction with the release of a new Scholastic book, Looking for Miza.

"The whole purpose [of the summit] is to allow people like you to know there's a problem and that together we can solve it," Clinton told the Kid Reporters at a meeting at the Sheraton Hotel in New York City. The Clinton Global Initiative is holding a four-day meeting at the Sheraton this week in conjunction with the opening session of the United Nations. "You need to let people know what they can do to help. You are a long way along already."
 
The students will explore the causes of the problem—mainly loss of habitat—and come up with solutions during a live web cast from the Scholastic Auditorium. You can log on to the web cast from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Friday, at http://www.scholastic.com/miza.

Clinton also assured the two American Kid Reporters that kids in the U.S. can help too.

"You're not so far away, not with the Internet," he told Scholastic News. "Kids in America are very good about wanting to help animals and the environment. The main thing is that you work together and decide what you want the children of America to do and then let them know. You can use the Internet to tell them your solutions. There are thousands of kids like you who want to support animals and the environment." Clinton called this generation of American kids "the most pro-environment, pro-species generation in the history of this country."

"But you can only act if you're told what the problem is and what can be done to effectively solve it," he said. "You can tell kids and mobilize them. You can facilitate change." 

Check back with Scholastic News Online later in the week for more news about the first-ever Looking for Miza Kids Gorilla Summit.

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK

Read today’s story and answer the following question.

blog it President Bill Clinton called your generation of students the most pro-environment and pro-species in the history of this country. Do you agree with him and if so, why do you think this is true?

Tell us what you think on the Scholastic News Online Blog!


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About the Author

Michael Carboni is a member of the Scholastic Kids Press Corps.

Lya Ferreyra is a Kid Reporter in the Scholastic Kids Press Corps.

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